THE FIRST ELECTION IN HOFFMAN ESTATES

December 4, 2016

Our guest contributor this week is Pat Barch, the Hoffman Estates Historian.  This column originally appeared in the November 2016 issue of the Hoffman Estates Citizen, the village’s newsletter.  The column appears here, courtesy of the Village of Hoffman Estates.

voteThe first election held in Hoffman Estates was November 7, 1959.  We had just voted for incorporation for the village in September and now the residents would go to the polls to elect a new village president and board of trustees.

Unlike the long drawn out political campaigning that goes on now, the early residents had only 6 weeks to learn about the candidates that would govern them for the next 4 years, very little time to make such important decisions.

The population of Hoffman Estates was only 8000 residents but that was a lot of door bells to rings and visits to be made to persuade neighbors and friends to vote for either the Good Government Party or the People’s Party.

It was decided that the elections would be non-partisan, neither Republican nor Democrat.  Both parties would rely on posters, flyers and newspapers to get their message across to so many in so little time.

Election Day finally arrived on November 7.  After three votes to incorporate, the early residents finally had a say in who would govern them and how they would govern themselves.  Now the democratic process would help them shape their future.

The residents of Hoffman Estates would choose Ed Pinger as President, Marilyn Brading as Clerk, James Gannon, Bruce Berger, Ed Deerfield, Ed Cunningham, John Pickering and Roy Jenkins as Trustees.  The Good Government Party had won the election.

On November 12, 1959 the first village board meeting was held.  It was the first of many and the beginning of the Village of Hoffman Estates.

Pat Barch
Hoffman Estates Village Historian
Eagle2064@comcast.net

BUYING A CAR IN SCHAUMBURG TOWNSHIP

November 27, 2016

Most people in Schaumburg Township know that Golf Road has always been the place to go car shopping.  And, if it’s not Golf Road itself, it’s darned close to Golf Road.

Part of what makes Golf Road so ideal is its easy-to-get-to location off of Route 53 and I-90.  Plus, it is a long stretch of road that winds through a fair number suburbs to the east and brings many car buyers to Schaumburg Township.  Hence, its earlier name–the Evanston-Elgin Road–as it used to be called.Franklin Weber

When someone recently suggested a blog posting on the car dealerships of Schaumburg Township, I thought I’d start a list that readers could contribute to.  After combing through various phone books dating back to 1982, I’ve compiled the following list.  Because we do not have any before that date, there is an obvious gap in the listing.  This is where you come in…

If I’ve forgotten one of the NEW car dealerships please make a comment or send me an email.  I’ll be happy to add it to the list!

  • Advantage Suzuki of Schaumburg
    650 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Audi Hoffman Estates
    1200 W. Golf Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Bob Rohrman Schaumburg Ford
    815 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Bob Rohrman Schaumburg Lincoln
    1200 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Colonial Chevrolet
    1100 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Ed Murphy Buick-Opel-Suzuki-Volkswagen
    1000 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Fireside Chrysler Plymouth
    1020 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Fireside Imports-Fiat, Mazda
    1020 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Fox Valley Volkswagen Schaumburg
    1000 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Franklin Weber Pontiac  (Est. 1968)
    100 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Jacobs Davids Bierk Cadillac
    526 Mall Drive
    Schaumburg
  • Jeep Eagle of Schaumburg
    920 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Land Rover Hoffman Estates
    1051 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Larry Faul Oldsmobile-Peugeot-GMC Truck Co.
    1230 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Larry Faul Pontiac Subaru
    100 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Mercedes-Benz of Hoffman Estates
    1000 W. Golf Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Muller’s Woodfield Acura
    1099 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Napleton’s Schaumburg Pontiac-GMC Trucks
    100 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Napleton Subaru
    911 W. Higgins Road
    Schaumburg
  • Northwest Acura
    1099 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Northwest Lincoln-Mercury
    1200 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick BMW
    700 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick Cadillac
    526 Mall Drive
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick Hyundai
    1020 E. Golf Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Patrick Mini
    700 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick Saab
    524 Mall Drive
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick Volvo
    526 Mall Drive
    Schaumburg
  • Resnick Automotive Group
    350 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Robert Harris’ Woodfield Oldsmobile/GMC Truck
    1230 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Roselle AMC Jeep
    920 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Roselle Dodge
    208 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Saturn of Hoffman Estates
    125 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Schaumburg AMC (Pacer, Gremlin, Hornet, Matador)
    921 W. Higgins Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Audi
    320 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Chrysler Plymouth Mazda
    1020 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Datsun
    910 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Dodge
    208 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Honda
    750 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Hyndai
    690 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Isuzu
    650 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Lincoln-Mercury
    1200 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Mitsubishi
    660 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Oldsmobile
    1230 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Saturn
    125 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Schaumburg Subaru
    911 W. Higgins Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Toyota Scion  (Est. 1978)
    875 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Suburban Volkswagen
    320 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Woodfield Chevrolet-Geo
    1100 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Woodfield Ford
    815 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Woodfield Hummer
    1100 E. Golf Road
    1230 E. Golf Road (later)
    Schaumburg
  • Woodfield Hyundai
    125 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Woodfield Lexus
    155 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Woodfield Nissan
    700 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Ziegler Chevrolet
    1230 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

 

SCHAUMBURG THROUGH THE DECADES: A MONTHLY LOOK BACK (NOVEMBER)

November 20, 2016

During Schaumburg’s 60th anniversary year of 2016, we will take a look back at the Schaumburg  you’ve known for the last six decades.  Every month there will be a posting on 3 village happenings for each decade the village has been in existence.  Maybe you remember some of the events and have something more to add to a few of the items?  Send in your comments!

60 Years Ago in 1956

  • More than 1500 suburban residents–including those from the newly formed village of Schaumburg–participated in a fund drive to raise $1 million for a new hospital to be built near Arlington Heights.  The hospital was to be named Northwest Community Hospital and is shown below.northwest-community-hospital
  • In a classified ad in The Herald, a “modern 2-family house, [with] income $200 per month, large barn [on] 5 3/4 acres” was listed for $17,000.  It was listed as being the first house east of the church in Schaumburg.  The reference is to St. Peter Lutheran Church along Schaumburg Road.
  • Anyone having scrap paper and/or rags was invited to drop them off at St. Peter Lutheran School on Friday, November 23, the day of their Scrap Paper Drive.  It was requested that the bundles be securely tied.

50 Years Ago in 1966

  • Ace Hardware, at the corner of Schaumburg and Roselle Roads, was having a sale on the following products:  TV tray table set for $5.99, deluxe wall can opener for $5.87, portable ice crusher for $7.99, 8-inch cast iron skillet for $1.89, bath scale for $8.99 and clock radio for $13.88.clock-radio
  • It was announced in mid November that Mayor Robert Atcher would run for reelection the following April.  A slate of three additional village board candidates of the Schaumburg United Party (SUP) was also announced.  They include:  Raymond Kessell, Donald Wench and Gordon Mullins.  Sandy Carsello was also included as a candidate for Village Clerk.
  • An open house for the new Thomas Dooley school was scheduled for Sunday, November 20 from 1-4 p.m.  It is the 12th school in Schaumburg Township and the third school in the village of Schaumburg.  The building was built to resemble its sister school, Winston Churchill School, in Hoffman Estates.  The principal was Karl Plank who had been previously employed as principal at Black Hawk school.

40 Years Ago in 1976

  • Schaumburg banded together with seven other northwest suburban communities to begin the process of getting on the Lake Michigan water pipeline.  The name of the group was called SHARE +3.  The projected cost for the village was $11.8 million to $16.6 million.
  • Schaumburg Road between Springinsguth and Barrington Road was scheduled to be improved and widened.  The award for the 1 1/2 mile stretch of road was awarded to Palumbo Excavating Co.
  • Musicland and J.G. Music Center in Woodfield Mall was advertising specials on the following stereo lps and tapes:  Phoebe Snow’s It Looks Like Phoebe Snow, Blue Oyster Cult’s Agents of Fortune, Earth Wind & Fire’s Spirit, Neil Diamond’s Beautiful Noise, Boz Scagg’s Silk Degrees, O’ Jays’ Message in the Music, and Boston’s Boston.  

30 Years Ago in 1986

  • Daruma of Schaumburg which opened at 1823 W. Golf Road in Schaumburg in August was reviewed in the Chicago Tribune.  The long-running, Japanese restaurant can still be found in the same location in the Poplar Creek Plaza thirty years later!daruma
  • On Black Friday, the Friday after Thanksgiving, the parking lot at Woodfield Mall was filled with 10,288 cars by 1:00 p.m.  The attendance was estimated to be 150,000 which was the norm for the past few years.
  • The Annex shopping center in Schaumburg was having sales at the following stores:  Mix ‘n Munch, Card & Gift Gallery, Pier 1 Imports, Kids Place, Stacy’s Bags and Baggage, Space Options, Pro Ski & Surf, Waves Personal Hair Care, Van Heusen Factory Store and Lingerie Factory.

20 Years Ago in 1996

  • Consideration was given by the village board to requiring address numbers of businesses to be a certain size, depending on how far the establishment is from the street.
  • It was reported that, for the first time, Septemberfest turned a profit and moved closer towards being a self-supporting event.  The success of the festival was attributed to corporate sponsorships, increased fees, in-kind donations, a larger take of the Taste of Schaumburg food and beverage receipts and cleanup by Manpower.
  • Mayor Larson laid the first brick of the new terminal at Schaumburg Regional Airport.  This kicked off the development of the building that would hold administrative offices, a restaurant, aircraft maintenance areas and a flight school.  Pilot Pete’s became the eventual restaurant and can still be found at the airport.pilot-petes

10 Years Ago in 2006

  • Schaumburg announced they would be be featuring another year of the outdoor holiday festival in Town Square called Christkindlesmarkt.  Sponsored with the Schaumburg Township District Library, the festival would be an open market with European influences.  A Festival of Lights would be part of the festivities as well as horse-drawn sleigh rides.
  • Janet Niemann, the founding chairperson of the Schaumburg Sister Cities Commission, passed away November 6.  She also chaired Schaumburg Township’s Youth Commission and was very involved in the Jaycees and Jayceettes, having been a past president.
  • El Meson, Rupert’s On The Top and Prairie Rock Brewing Company all were featured in a Night Out:  Guide for Dining and Entertainment in the Daily Herald.  

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

The photos of Northwest Community Hospital and the clock radio are used courtesy of the Daily Herald.  The photo of Pilot Pete’s is courtesy of Ted and John Koston from their Flickr page.  

CHRISTMAS IN THE SPRING VALLEY

November 20, 2016

The Volkening Heritage Farm & Merkle Cabin will help you experience the holiday season as it was in 1880s Schaumburg.  Elaborate Victorian decorations and traditional German foods filled the home with light and warmth, but farm work continued at its own pace.

See how German-American farm families in 19th century Schaumburg celebrated Christmas with traditional foods, simple homemade gifts and a continuation of their daily farm chores. Meet a traditional St. Nicholas and enjoy a cup of soup by the fireplace at the log cabin. The day will include refreshments, holiday treats, cookie decorating for the kids and craft activities.

Admission is $3/person or $12/family; free for children 3 and under.

Join the farm as they celebrate the holiday season on Saturday and Sunday, December 3 & 4 from 12 to 4 p.m.

PRAIRIE CENTER FOR THE ARTS

November 13, 2016

 

Prairie Center 2 of 1

Prairie Center 2 of 2

These wonderful renderings of the Schaumburg Prairie Center for the Arts were recently discovered on a 1983 calendar prepared by the First Bank of Schaumburg.

The drawings were created by architects, LaRocca Associates of Chicago, in anticipation of construction of the Prairie Center.  It had been many years in the making and was soon to come to fruition.

Two years later, on March 13, 1985, the invitation for bids went out to the public.  Final approval had been given for a building that would contain a 429-seat theater, ticket office and conference rooms, as well as an outdoor plaza.  The location would be just east of the Municipal Center on Summit Drive at a planned cost of $2.2 million. The project was paid for through a special endowment of funds collected over the years from developers.

Not surprisingly, there had been earlier suggestions for an even larger venue.  As far back as 1968, former Mayor Robert Atcher had originally planned a 500-seat drama theater and a 900-seat concert hall.  Scott Fisher, who was the chairman of the Cultural Commission in 1983, favored a 750-seat hall but the price was too high.  And, interestingly, prior consideration had also been given to a proposed site near Woodfield Mall.

The bid for the scaled down project in 1985 was eventually awarded to International Contractors of Elmhurst and building commenced in May of that year.

During the course of construction, consideration was given to who would be the director of the Cultural Center.  By July, Village President Herbert Aigner suggested that the village board opt for former President Bob Atcher as the ideal candidate.  “His heart is in this.  He’s in the entertainment field. He’s got contacts with major business people and a tremendous reputation.”  (Daily Herald, 7/17/1985)  After giving it some thought, the 71-year-old President Atcher turned down the job, concerned that the time necessary to devote to the job was more than he was comfortable with.

In October the village hired Elizabeth Armistead, former program coordinator for the Hemmen’s Auditorium in Elgin.  Going forward, her duties were to manage the Center, be involved in the construction process of the building, establish a group of part-time workers to assist her in day-to-day operations and seek out entertainment for the venue.  To this day, Ms. Armistead continues in her role, even as that role has expanded to include oversight of Septemberfest, the Prairie Arts Festival, the village’s cable channels and the Volunteer of the Year Awards program.

On June 14, 1986, a little over a year after the project had begun, grand opening ceremonies were held.  The stars of the show were former Schaumburg Village President Robert Atcher and his wife Maggie and their three children.  Having long desired such a facility for the village, the Atcher family returned their gratitude with a country and western concert to the an appreciative audience of nearly 200 people.

Kudos were also extended to William Lambert who originally donated some 40 acres of land to the village as the future site of the municipal center and cultural center.  He was given the honor of cutting the ribbon that stretched from end to end across the new stage.

prairie-center-interior

prairie-center-exterior

Twenty years later, during the 50th anniversary year of the Village of Schaumburg, the theater at the Prairie Center was officially dedicated to Maggie Atcher who helped form the first cultural arts commission in Schaumburg.  It was a fitting bookend to the building next door, the Robert O. Atcher Municipal Center.

Today the Prairie Center continues to offer itself as a lineup for entertainment, a venue for local orchestras and choirs and a patio for the festivals held on the municipal center grounds.  Even if you haven’t been there for an attraction, you may just want to stroll the grounds.  The walking paths are an enticement to return again!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

WHO IS THIS YOUNG LADY?

November 6, 2016

Every once in a while I receive a photo that is difficult–or maybe impossible–to identify.  In this case a local gentleman dropped off two photos with the hopes of giving them a good home since they do not depict any of his family members.  The photo of the twin baby girls had names on the back and was easy enough for him to confirm.  But the other one, a confirmation photo of a young lady, has been a struggle.  The photographer on the photo is Mosser from Palatine so, clearly, the young lady is a local girl.

Here’s where it gets interesting though.  The photo, oddly enough, has two names on the back.  They are “Milly Mess” and “Helena Mueller.”  They are written in two different handwritings and in two different colors of ink, with Milly’s name more in the center of the photo.

confirmation-girl

Where to start?  Recognizing the Mess surname, I contacted a member of the family who, indeed, acknowledged her aunt was Emilie (Quindel) Mess or “Millie” for short.  Emilie was born on May 14, 1889 in Schaumburg to Charles and Caroline (Busche) Quindel.  According to confirmation records for St. Peter Lutheran Church, Emilie was confirmed in 1902 around the time she turned 13.  Given the length of the dress in this photo, it is quite probable this photo is from that time period.

Millie married Otto Mess at age 21, eight years after the confirmation photo was taken.  Below is a  photo we have of Millie in our Local History Digital Archive.  She is clearly older than the young lady in the confirmation photo.  Do the two photos depict the same young lady?   The dates for Millie certainly align with the confirmation photo.

millie-mess

Information for the other young lady took a bit more effort to track down.  Mueller can be spelled so many ways in government and church records–Muller, Miller, etc.  I tried the census for the years 1900-1920 and did not have any luck.  I also tried variations on the first name–Helena, Helen, Helene, etc.  I then tried a simple search of Helena Mueller in the Daily Herald and bingo!

There was a reference in an obituary to Helena (Mueller) Heine.  Additional obituaries  mentioned that she was married to Oscar Heine.  With such a distinctive first and last name, I tried searching for him on findagrave.com and there he was.  And his wife?  Rosa Helene “Helena” Muller Heine.  With a photo included on the page!  I’d obviously hit the bonanza.  And I’ll be darned if she didn’t look very similar to our young lady in the photo above.

helena-mueller

The problem is that Helena was born February 17, 1882 in Germany. In talking to the descendant who posted the photo and data on findagrave.com, I was told that Helena was confirmed in 1897 and came to the United States with her husband and son after marrying in 1905.  The photo above was taken in 1905 when she was 22 or 23, probably around the time she married.   Given her time frame and all of these details, it’s very unlikely that she is the young lady.

So, the mystery remains.  Is it Millie?  Or more remotely, is it a relative of Helena?  Taking a bit of a closer look at the confirmation photo, it looks like the girl’s nose tilts downwards.  Millie’s nose does the same thing.  Helena’s seems to tilt upwards.  However, the young lady’s hair appears to have some wave and curl to it just like Helena’s.    In the confirmation photo, the young lady looks more sedate and relaxed.  Millie looks more tense and staunch in her photo while Helena has the same relaxed expression as our mysterious young lady.

Until someone comes forward with another copy of the photo it appears we cannot definitively identify the young lady.  Whoever she is, her mother must have lovingly sewed her dress–and ironed it!–for the occasion.  It’s probably a safe bet that those are new shoes too.  Confirmation was a special moment in a young Lutheran girl’s life and it would be a shame to leave her unidentified.

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

The photo of Helena is used courtesy of the contributor to Helena Heine’s findagrave.com listing.  My thanks to C. Debenport for posting the photo and passing on more info about Helena.  She shared wonderfully researched information with me as I created this blog posting.

 

FROM HOGHOUSE TO SMOKEHOUSE

November 2, 2016

Join the Volkening Heritage Farm as they guide you through demonstrations on what it meant to preserve meat on an 1880s working farm.

Staff will smoke hams, show salt-cured meat and explain how every part of a pig was used (except the squeal!).  Children’s activities will be available throughout the day.

The program will be held on Sunday, November 20, 2016 from Noon to 4:00 p.m .

Admission is $3/person or $12/per family of six or fewer–additional members are $3 each.  Free for children 3 and under.

Parking will be available at Spring Valley Nature Center at 1111 E. Schaumburg Road, Schaumburg . A free wagon shuttle will take visitors to the farm.

For more information, call (847) 985-2115.

 

SCHAUMBURG CENTRE SCHOOL OPEN HOUSE

October 31, 2016

The Schaumburg Township Historical Society will sponsor an open house of the Schaumburg Centre School on Sunday, November 13, 2016.  The open house will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  The schoolhouse is located on the St. Peter Lutheran Church property.

Constructed in 1872–and first called Sarah’s Grove School, it is believed to have been the first of five public schools in Schaumburg Township. It was later renamed Schween’s Grove School and called Schaumburg Centre Public School until 1954. For 82 years, the building served as a one-room schoolhouse, and was the last active one room schoolhouse in District 54.

With the widening of Schaumburg Road, the building was saved from demolition and temporarily placed on the grounds of the Town Square Shopping Center in 1979. It was permanently relocated to the St. Peter Lutheran Church property in September, 1981. It has been fully restored as a museum and is under the auspices of the Schaumburg Township Historical Society.

You can check out the Historical Society’s website here.

THE OFFICIAL FLOWER AND TREE OF HOFFMAN ESTATES

October 30, 2016

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of Hoffman Estates, the Environmental Commission sponsored a contest to select an official Village flower and tree.  Many may not know that we have a Village flower and tree.  The announcement of the winners was published in the September/October 1979 Citizen newsletter.

Ginger Dickerson, who had lived in the village for 8 years, chose the daisy for the official flower of Hoffman Estates.   She said that the daisy “has always been a symbol of simplicity and durability.”  She also said that “the daisy was growing on the land long before there were people or houses in Hoffman Estates.” daisy

The daisy is one of my favorite flowers.  As children we always played the “he/she loves me, he/she loves me not” game as we picked off each petal to learn the truth.  I also learned that the daisy represents a new beginning.  It certainly is a flower that represents many new beginnings for all the residents of Hoffman Estates.

Dave Pivorunas, “ a senior honor student majoring in ornamental horticulture at Michigan State University”  felt that the Hackberry tree should be the village’s official tree.  The tree is native to the area and has a beautiful cork like bark as well as loads of purple berries that the birds love to feast on in the fall.   In doing some research on the tree I found that the berries are edible and have a high fat content  that helps birds survive the winter or their migration south.

Dave felt that the tree would be the best choice for village tree because, at that time, it was the oldest and largest tree growing on the old village hall property on Illinois Blvd., now the Children’s Advocacy Center.

I had to drive over to the old village hall and see for myself if the tree was still there, and it was.  It’s a majestic tree, hugging the front of the old Geiske/Hammerstein farm house, shading a majority of the roof and gracefully hanging over the front walk.  The farmhouse dates back to the late 1840s and the tree could be well over 150 years old.

hackberry-tree-2

 

Perhaps in the future, we can consider choosing a village bird since we have more than 4000 acres of park district and forest preserve land within our village boundaries.  I can’t even count the number of different bird species that I hear and see in my neighborhood, maybe for our 60th anniversary.

Pat Barch, Hoffman Estates Historian
eagle2064@comcast.net

PIZZA HUT COMES TO TOWN

October 23, 2016

There were other places to get pizza in Schaumburg in 1975 but when Pizza Hut finally came to town, it was reason for a little rejoicing.  Even though it was a bit off the beaten path at the time of its construction–relatively speaking–it was exciting to welcome this well-known pizza chain to the area.

Classified ads for this location began appearing in the Daily Herald in July 1975.  They were looking for cooks and management personnel at their new location at 914 Roselle Road, just north of Wise.  You can actually see the building in this 1977 aerial photo.

Notice two-lane Roselle Road in the background of the photo.  Hartford Drive is the road that bisects off of Roselle and leads to the Pheasant Walk subdivision that is under construction.  Two doors down and to the left of Hartford Drive is Pizza Hut.  (It is noticeable because of its standard Pizza Hut roof!)  Fortunately, it was built far enough off of the street for the eventual widening of Roselle Road.

pheasant-walk

The building was built in the standard style of most Pizza Huts of the time, as you can see below.  It obviously had the prototypical red roof at one time.  That was changed at some point as can be seen in the more recent photo below.

pizza-hut-1

The restaurant lasted for many years, serving pizza, salad and pitcher after pitcher of cold pop and beer.  It closed its doors in 2013 and sat dormant until it was torn down a few weeks ago in September, 2016.

pizza-hut-2

But, isn’t it nice to remember date night in the booths or getting loud and raucous with your friends at a couple of tables with the jukebox playing the top hits of the day?  All while you waited for that cheezy goodness that was going to burn the roof of your mouth?  Remember when those pan pizzas first hit the menu?  Yummy.

Just a year later, another Pizza Hut opened at 1280 W. Higgins Road in Hoffman Estates.  This building can still be found three doors to the west of Hoffman Estates High School and is the location for Simply Stereo.  It has been modified so that there are now shutters on the windows and has a bright green roof.

simply-stereo

All in all, two nice pizza bookends for Schaumburg Township!

[As an update, the location on Roselle Road is soon to be a Dunkin’ Donuts.]

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

(Thank you to http://www.mashable.com for the use of the Simply Stereo photo.)