Archive for the ‘Shopping Centers’ Category

THE HISTORY OF BARRINGTON SQUARE MALL

October 22, 2017

Our guest contributor this week is Pat Barch, the Hoffman Estates Historian.  This column originally appeared in the October 2017 issue of the Hoffman Estates Citizen, the village’s newsletter.  The column appears here, courtesy of the Village of Hoffman Estates.

Barrington Square Mall, located on the north side of Higgins Road east of Barrington Road, was so different when it was first built in the early 70s.  The main store was Robert Hall Village which was originally located on the southeast corner of Roselle & Golf Roads.  That location has also seen many changes.  The Robert Hall Village store in Barrington Square became K-Mart and later the Menard’s store that was torn down and that we all miss.

Shopping at Barrington Square Mall back in the 70s gave the flavor of town and country.  Across Higgins Road, you could clearly see the beautiful large Steinmeyer farmhouse.  George Steinmeyer still kept a herd of Black Angus steers out in the fields as well as hay and oats that you could see being harvested each fall.

There was a Dominick’s store with Garibaldi’s Pizza on the corner and Flip Side Record store in between.  GiGi’s Playhouse is where Dominick’s used to be and the Poplar Creek Bowl is still there.

An AMC sixplex movie theater was so popular with my family.  Set to the rear of the mall, it only cost $3 for adults and 1.50 for children’s tickets.  First run movies were shown then, but AMC sold the theater to Classic Cinema who showed second run movies for only $1.00.  One of the favorite afternoons for my kids was to take in a movie and still have money enough to buy a slice of pizza and a cold drink at Garibaldis.  The hobby shop was also a favorite with remote control race cars, trains and rockets.  A stop in Baskin Robbins was also a frequent activity.

Of all the merchants that called the Barrington Square Mall home, the most noteworthy was the Flip Side record shop.  In 1978, the Village of Hoffman Estates passed an ordinance that banned the sale of drug paraphernalia and required the merchant to apply for a license to sell such goods at a cost of $150. They would have to keep a record of the customer’s names who bought his merchandise.  Flip Side was a very popular record store and the place where the kids lined up to get their concert tickets but were also able to buy drug paraphernalia from a very prominent display of all of these items.  Not wanting to obey the ordinance, Flip Side, Inc. sued Hoffman Estates.

The Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals agreed with Flip Side but the Village took the fight to the highest court, the United States Supreme Court.  Our lawyer, Richard Williams, argued the case before them on Dec. 9, 1981 and on March 3, 1982 Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall read the unanimous decision stating that Hoffman Estates did have a valid & constitutional ordinance.  We had won the case that made a difference all around the country.  Small shops and stores could see that other villages were writing their own ordinances.  Many closed knowing that they had been legislated out of business.

Flip Side closed long ago.  We also lost Burger King to a larger one at the southeast corner of Barrington & Higgins.  The old McDonald’s closed also with a bigger and better restaurant just west of the old one.  Stop by Barrington Square Mall and see what’s new.

Pat Barch, Hoffman Estates Village Historian
eagle2064@comcast.net

*The photo of the mall at the top of the blog is used courtesy of of the former Profile Publications, Inc. of Crystal Lake, IL.

**This column gives us a wonderful opportunity to start a list of all of the businesses located in the shopping center.  We’ll begin with those that Pat mentioned:

  • America’s Bar
  • Associated Wallcoverings
  • Barrington Square Barber Shop (Jim Gerz, owner)
  • Barrington Square Cards, Coins & Comics
  • Barrington Square Theaters  (1979-2000)
  • Baskin Robbins
  • Burger King  (outlot)
  • Buona Beef (outlot)
  • Cherry Shoes
  • Citadel Realtors
  • Dairy Queen
  • Dominick’s  (Closed in 1988)
  • Edie Adam’s Cut & Curl
  • Eye Opener
  • FlipSide Records
  • Garibaldi’s Pizza & Pasta House
  • Gigi’s Playhouse
  • Golden Bear Restaurant (outlot)
  • Hair Pros
  • Maloney’s Hallmark
  • JoAnn Fabrics
  • K-Mart  (1978-1992)
  • McDonald’s  (outlot)
  • Magic Year Children’s Wear
  • Menard’s
  • Official’s Time Out (restaurant)
  • Peter Pan Cleaners
  • Pizza Hut  (outlot)
  • Poplar Creek Bowl
  • Robert Hall Village
  • Shanghai Restaurant
  • Sportsplex (After Dominick’s and before Poplar Creek Bowl)
  • Tub N Towel

If you have any to add, send a comment to the blog or an email to me.  Thank you!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

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A QUESTION ABOUT THE TRADEWINDS SHOPPING CENTER

October 15, 2017

 

Back in April, a blog posting ran on the Tradewinds Shopping Center in Hanover Park that was at the intersection of Barrington and Irving Park Roads.   It was a popular posting judging by the number of hits it received.  There is a lot of love for this place and clearly many have good memories of shopping, going to the theater and hanging out in the stores and restaurants.

There has also been a steady stream of comments trickling in regarding the shops that were there at one time or another.  This is the list that we currently have:

  • Allied Electronics (later became Radio Shack)
  • Ames
  • Blockbuster Video in the outlot on the corner
  • B. Dalton bookstore in the Library location before the library
  • Collin’s Fireplace and Patio
  • Corky’s lunch counter in the Walgreens
  • Dominick’s
  • First State Bank & Trust Company of Hanover Park
  • Full House (formerly St. George and The Dragon)
  • Hair Cuttery
  • Hallmark
  • Hanover Fabrics
  • Hanover Park Interior Lighting
  • Hit or Miss
  • Jack Robbins
  • Just Jeans
  • Kinney Shoes
  • Leslie’s Pool Supplies
  • Lincoln Realty
  • Peter Pan Cleaners
  • Radio Shack
  • Rahl Jewelers
  • Rent-A-Center
  • Ron’s Hobby Center
  • St. George and The Dragon
  • Saxon Paint
  • Star Cleaners
  • Swanson’s Crafts and Hobbies (Jack Swanson, proprietor)
  • Three Flags Restaurant
  • Toni’s Conversation Clothes
  • Tradewinds Pets & Supplies
  • Tri-Village Realty
  • Value City Furniture
  • Walgreens
  • Zayre

One person remembered a pet store that sold fish and I was able to track down Tradewinds Pets & Supplies.

He also remembered a coin shop but I’ve had no luck with that.  Another remembered a record store which I’ve also not been able to track down.  Someone else remembered a shoe repair shop as well.

If any of you can come up with any of these three businesses–or any more to add to the list–I’d be happy to oblige.  Thank you in advance for wracking your brains!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

THE FIRST JEWEL AT HOFFMAN PLAZA: VERSION 3

July 30, 2017

While the old Jewel in Hoffman Plaza is being reconfigured, we’ve been delighted to see remnants of it still visible as the outer facade was torn off.  We’ve seen the barrel roof and brick walls that have been uncovered.

And, just recently while traveling down Roselle Road, I noticed that the curved struts and braces of the interior are now visible.

Pat Barch, the Hoffman Estates Historian, noticed the same thing and was able to take the picture below that is even more up close. The condition appears to be quite sound.  It is amazing to us that the developers saw the worth in this part of the structure and incorporated it as part of the new building.

It’s fascinating to consider that this structure is now almost 60 years old.  This brief timeline of Jewel in Hoffman Plaza gives you an idea of the importance of this location.

  • Jewel opened Summer of 1959.
  • Osco opened in the Jewel in September 1964.
  • The Jewel-Osco relocated to its current location on April 14, 1973.

This is today’s Jewel, still in the 1973 location, with the 1955 water tower ever present in the background.  You can also see the water tank in the background that was built in 1962.  (For more information on these water storage facilities of Hoffman Estates, read Pat’s column from August 2010.)

Who knows if the old Jewel will ever be uncovered again?  We’re just glad that we got a glimpse of it before it was encased in the redeveloped Burlington Coat Factory.  It was nice to take the photographs when the opportunity presented itself!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

WHAT THE DEMOLITION AT HOFFMAN PLAZA REVEALED

April 30, 2017

Hoffman Plaza came up twice this week in conversation.  The first mention revolved around the demolition at the shopping center.   Hoffman Estates Historian Pat Barch wrote about the Plaza’s plans in her January 2017 column in the Hoffman Estates Citizen.  As she mentioned, the south portion of the 58-year-old plaza is being demolished.  I’ve been tracking the progress as I make my commute each day and, one day this week, while driving by, I saw this:

 

When I looked closer I realized what I was seeing.  It was the roof and brick outline of the original Jewel that opened in Hoffman Plaza.  Hidden for all of these years behind the more modern facade of the plaza were the round barrel roof and brick walls of the first Jewel to make its way to Schaumburg Township.

This Jewel opened in the summer of 1959 and faced Higgins Road.  A line of shops extending to the west towards Roselle Road were connected to it.  Snyder Walgreen Drug Agency was one of those that opened at the same time.  As Pat said in her column, Ben Franklin, Twinbrook Hardware, Turpin Fabrics & Drapery, a beauty shop owned by Frank Vaccaro and a doctor’s office opened later in 1959 and on into 1960.

Maybe you can see something more in these photos:

If you spot anything, chime in and let me know.  And, for those of you who do not live in the area, just a heads up that a Burlington Store is planned for the shopping center. (Click on the photo below and you can see the sign off to the left.)  According to a Daily Herald article from April 19, 2017, a 50,000 square foot store will open in the location of the former Dania furniture store.  With a light now at the entrance to the shopping center on Roselle Road, it should make for some easy shopping!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

Many thanks to Pat Barch for jumping in her car to take the photo of the Jewel in the early morning hours and some of the others you see here.  Teardowns can happen so fast that it’s necessary to get there as fast as we can.  I appreciate her alacrity!

Look for another column on Hoffman Plaza next week…

THE TRADEWINDS SHOPPING CENTER OF HANOVER PARK

April 9, 2017

The year 1968 was a big one for Hanover Park.  Anne Fox School opened.  A new fire station on Maple Street opened.  And, commercially speaking, the village’s largest business venture opened as the Tradewinds Shopping Center.

In 1967 3H Building Corporation purchased the Melvin Lichthardt farm that stood at the northeast corner of Irving Park and Barrington Roads.  [From Camelot to Metropolis, Ralph Feeley, 1976]  Development began shortly thereafter, and in 1968 the $3.5 million,  200,000 square foot shopping center opened.  [Chain Store Age]

It wasn’t until 1969 that Dominick’s and Zayre, the two large anchors, opened.  Zayre opened October 8 in 80,000 square feet while Dominicks, with Bob Johnson as the manager, opened December 13 in a 30,000 square foot store that eventually expanded to 65,000 square feet.

The ad for Dominicks described it as “a truly modern and beautiful food store that was created and designed to make shopping an adventure, a pleasurable experience, the last word in exceptional convenience.”  Given away that day were 40 bushels of groceries, gifts, balloons, piggy banks, and aprons and nylons for the ladies.

The shopping center really came into its own on July 6, 1973 (per commenter Dan, below) when the Tradewinds Cinema I and II opened as twin theaters. During those intervening years between 1968 and 1973, the shopping center had boomed with the following stores:

  • Walgreens
  • Peter Pan Cleaners
  • Hanover Park Interior Lighting
  • Hanover Fabrics (November 1970)
  • Lincoln Realty
  • Tri-Village Realty

Outbuildings in the shopping center included the First State Bank & Trust Company of Hanover Park and, more popularly, the St. George and The Dragon restaurant.  This was the third restaurant in the old English-themed chain that featured pickles and peanuts at every table.

The shopping center eventually included the Hanover Park branch of the Schaumburg Township District Library, Ames and later Value City Furniture that took over the Zayre space, Rahl Jewelers, Hallmark and Radio Shack.

Unfortunately, during the first decade of the 2000’s the shopping center began to decline.  Dominick’s pulled out sometime between 2002 and 2005.  The theaters also closed during this time period.  Then, in a double whammy in 2006, the library moved to its new branch on Irving Park Road and Menards purchased the entire shopping center property for about $9 million in preparation for their new store that stands there today.

This perpetually busy corner, with the Tradewinds Shopping Center as its anchor, was a go-to spot for anyone living in Hanover Park for many years.  Many stores came and went over the years besides those listed above.  Can you help complete the list?  Send in your comments or email me at the address below and I’ll add them as they come in.  Thanking you in advance for your inclusions!

Businesses in the Tradewinds Shopping Center:

  • Allied Electronics
  • Ames
  • Blockbuster Video in the outlot on the corner
  • B. Dalton bookstore in the Library location before the library
  • Collin’s Fireplace and Patio
  • Corky’s lunch counter in the Walgreens
  • Dominick’s
  • First State Bank & Trust Company of Hanover Park
  • Full House (formerly St. George and The Dragon)
  • Hair Cuttery
  • Hallmark
  • Hanover Fabrics
  • Hanover Park Interior Lighting
  • Hit or Miss
  • Just Jeans
  • Leslie’s Pool Supplies
  • Lincoln Realty
  • Peter Pan Cleaners
  • Rahl Jewelers
  • Rent-A-Center
  • Ron’s Hobby Center
  • St. George and The Dragon
  • Star Cleaners
  • Swanson’s Crafts and Hobbies (Jack Swanson, proprietor)
  • TCBY Yogurt
  • Three Flags Restaurant
  • Toni’s Conversation Clothes
  • Tradewinds Pets & Supplies
  • Tri-Village Realty
  • Value City Furniture
  • Walgreens
  • Zayre

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

[The photos were taken by the library prior to the Hanover Park branch moving into the shopping center in 1993.]

BUSINESSES OF THE FIRST TOWN SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER

January 12, 2014

Last week I wrote a brief history of the first Town Square Shopping Center that opened in 1971 on the southwest corner of the intersection of Schaumburg and Roselle Roads.  The center stayed in business until 1995 when it was purchased by the Village of Schaumburg.  During those 24 years of operation, many businesses came and went.  Below is a list of some of those establishments that occupied the low-slung, one-story, rustic mall that started operations just as the area was really taking off.Town Square 1

  • All American Army Surplus
  • Always Andrea
  • Anna Marie Dance Studios
  • The Art Mart
  • Beverly’s Shop
  • The Big Banjo (a restaurant that served pizza, ribs and chicken)
  • Bolger Realtors (?)
  • Calabrese Pizza
  • The Candy Barrel  (a specialty shop fondly remembered by many of those who grew up in the area)
  • Chez de Noux Coiffures  (hair salon)
  • Coins C. Stamps
  • Design III Interiors
  • Farmers Insurance
  • Fenton’s Window Fashions
  • Geronimo Birnbottom  (jeans and tops)
  • Green Apple (dress and jeans shop)
  • Homefinders (realtor)
  • Musacci’s Pizzeria
  • Norge Town Cleaners
  • Northwest Uniforms
  • Nosh Nook
  • Paddock Restaurant
  • Pizza Amore
  • Radio Schack
  • Ray’s Heating & Plumbing
  • Red Carpet Realtors
  • ReMax Realtors
  • Reno’s Upholstery
  • Resource (Fashions for women)
  • Schaumburg Auto Parts
  • Silver Reef (baseball cards)
  • The Stop  (a restaurant that is often mentioned and must beloved by those who enjoyed its hotdogs, hamburgers and other sandwiches)
  • Town Square Electrologists
  • Town Square Grog Shop (probably one of the most popular tenants of the shopping center and, certainly, the most visible from Roselle Road)
  • Town Square Hairstylists
  • Town Square Pharmacy (a long-time drug store owned and operated from 1971 until 1985 by Cliff Skarr who was also president of the Olde Schaumburg Center Commission)
  • Triangle Pet Center
  • V.F.W. Post 2202
  • Village Gate Realtors

This is a list of some of the tenants of the Medical Building that was at the west end of the shopping portion of Town Square–and not the separate building that came later.  This building contained six medical offices.

  • Dr. Lewis Hirsch—general dentist
  • Dr. Alberto Armas–pediatrician
  • Dr. Bruce Peterson–optometrist
  • Dr. Phillip La Spina—internal medicine
  • Mr. Joseph Bruns–physical therapy
  • Dr. Daniel Uditsky–general dentist
  • Dr. Emanuel Uditsky–general dentist (father of Daniel)

If you know of any others that I’ve missed, please send in your comments.  It’s nice to have as complete a list as possible.  Next week, the story of the Grog Shop and its origins!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library

Thank you to Dr. Daniel Uditsky for sharing the information on the Medical Building.

THE FIRST TOWN SQUARE SHOPPING CENTER

January 5, 2014

A year before the largest mall in the world drew its first customers, another shopping center in Schaumburg opened for business.  It was located at the intersection of Schaumburg and Roselle Roads and it was called Town Square.Town Square 3

For over a century, this intersection had been the shopping hub of Schaumburg Township.  The bank, hardware store, gas station, saloons, small grocery store, implement dealer, blacksmiths and Lutheran church and school had provided most of the services and sustenance the farmers needed to conduct their lives.

With an ever growing, urban population, it became increasingly obvious that additional shopping and office space was needed near the growing Weathersfield, Timbercrest and F & S homes that were sprouting up every day.

George Shapiro of Morwell Builders who were the developers of Timbercrest, purchased 27 acres on the southwest corner of the intersection and proceeded to erect the first phase that opened in early 1970.  It was noted by Mayor Robert Atcher in his annual report that appeared in the January 21, 1970 The Herald that “The Heritage Square portion of the Town Square Center is well under way.”  The look was meant to be “a step into the Early American atmosphere…  Throughout the center the heritage design will be followed.”  (The Herald, February 24, 1970)  And, in fact, the Olde Schaumburg Feasibility Study published in 1981 states that the buildings were “designed with what might be termed a ‘rustic’ appearance, an ‘old town’ image with a western flavor.” 

When the center opened, two other phases were planned as well as “a large lake and probably a clock tower.”  (The Herald, February 24, 1970)  One of the phases was to consist solely of medical buildings and a second phase was indeed built in 1975.  (Daily Herald, June 23, 1980)  They also intended to have a 10,000 square foot steak house and parking for 2200 cars!Town Square 1

Town Square eventually grew into a large L with the long arm bordering the Town Square Apartments (now Condominiums) to the south and the short arm bordering Sarah’s Grove Townhomes to the west.  Per the Olde Schaumburg Feasibility Study, the long arm housed “twenty-four individual commercial and retail establishments as well as a separate cluster of professional offices” which was the short arm.

In the middle of the L was a small pond, children’s zoo and sitting area.  According to Cliff Skarr who owned the Town Square Pharmacy and eventually became president of the Olde Schaumburg Center Commission, the zoo area was called the Pet Park and was fenced in by the first owners of the development.  He said the Park was designed by Don Eggelston and had ducks, geese, goats and a peacock as part of the menagerie.  He also mentioned that the Jaycees built the gazebo in the center while tree plantings were done by other local groups.

Town Square 2The shopping center was eventually bought from Arthur Frank in 1980 by Imperial Realty.  According to the Daily Herald article of June 23, 1980, Frank had purchased the center in 1977–ostensibly from Shapiro and Associates.  Imperial was caretaker of Town Square until the village of Schaumburg absorbed the property as part of a tax increment finance (TIF) district and purchased the center for redevelopment in 1995.   The only building that remains from the days of the first Town Square is the Trickster Gallery which was built in 1976 as Lake Cook Farm Supply.

Town Square is now anchored by the venerable Schaumburg Township District Library and includes a number of commercial enterprises.  It remains an important cornerstone of the township just as it did for the farmers of the 1850s and the early suburbanites of the 1970s.  Next week look for a list of businesses that operated over the years.  Maybe you can help us add to the list!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library