Archive for the ‘Restaurants, taverns, etc.’ Category

WHAT THE EASY STREET REVEALED

December 3, 2017

It’s always interesting that we drive past a building for years and never take as much notice as we should.  For instance, this was the Easy Street before the recent renovations began.

Then, one day after work began on the building, I took a good, long look at this view.

Wow.  The brick is completely different on the north face of the building.  It’s a yellowish, tan brick while the west and south facades are an actual red brick.  And, what about the east facade?  Well, it looked like this before the renovation.

On closer examination, it was obvious this side had been painted at some point in time.  But, what color was beneath that brick red paint?  Interestingly, as this facade was prepared for tuckpointing, it was determined that the brick was in severe disrepair–to the point that it crumbled very easily.  Also discovered was that the brick was not uniform but was an amalgamation of the two different types of brick that made up the building.  This brick discrepancy, and the 1976 fire that damaged the building, must have been reason enough for the previous owners to paint over the bricks.

Today, after much brick and mortar repair and replacement, the east and north facades look like this.  (The north facade is the one with the orange tube running alongside the building.)

But, the bigger question is why was this building originally constructed with two different types and color of bricks?  Having never really noticed buildings with varying brick types, I looked around and noticed that there was another building in Schaumburg that had the same dual brick scheme.  And it wasn’t far away.

This house is commonly known as the Quindel house and is adjacent to Lou Malnati’s on East Schaumburg Road.  You can see the red brick to the left that is on the front/north facade and the yellowish brick that covers the rest of the building.  

Besides the bricks, the thing that links these two buildings, is the name Quindel.  H.E. Quindel built both his home on Schaumburg Road that is now an office building, and the tavern/hotel that we know today as the Easy Street.

Mr. Quindel was quite the mover and shaker in Schaumburg Township in the early 1900s and always had a number of schemes in the works.  The home was constructed around 1909 and was built for his wife Caroline and their four sons,  Frank, Emil, Arthur, and Alfred.  The Easy Street was built in 1911 and was operated by Charles Krueger.

It was my presumption that Mr. Quindel used two different types of brick because of the cost of the brick.  The red brick was probably more expensive than the yellow brick.  Hence, the front of his house had red brick to greet and impress any guests, and to show its best side to Schaumburg Road.  The same would be said for the Easy Street.  Red brick was used on the south side where the main doors were located and on the front/west side that faced Schaumburg Road.  (This actually says a lot for where their traffic was coming from.  Obviously, people were coming up Roselle Road from the south, which meant they were coming from the village of Roselle or, possibly, from Irving Park Road.)

I still wanted to confirm that price was probably the reason for the two different color of bricks so I put the question out on a listserv.  Fortunately, Neil Gale with the Digital Research Library of Illinois History Journal, confirmed my supposition.  The yellow brick is called Chicago Common Brick and was a less expensive brick that was used on the sides and backs of apartment buildings and larger buildings in Chicago where price was an issue.  Note this photo from his blog posting on that topic.  It looks familiar, doesn’t it–and it verifies my suspicions.

When renovations and reconstructions happen, not only do we get the wonderful finished result, but we also get to see what is uncovered along the way.  The Easy Street truly is its own little archaeological dig.

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

Thank you to Neil Gale for helping me to confirm the rationale behind the two styles of brick!

 

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RENOVATING THE EASY STREET PUB

September 3, 2017

If you’ve been driving down Roselle Road near the Schaumburg Road intersection, you have probably noticed there’s something going on with the former Easy Street Pub at 17 Roselle Road.

Schaumburg village addressed these changes in their e-newsletter:

“Easy Street Pub was recently purchased and is undergoing some restoration and maintenance…The new owners are working to protect the building with tuckpointing, waterproofing and other improvements. The village is working with ownership to attract a new restaurant to the site that will be a destination for years to come.”

These photos were taken on August 2, 2017 shortly after work began at the end of July.

You’ll notice the windows have been completely removed but the doors are still intact as well as the gray siding.  It also appears they are doing extensive brick work on the south side of the building.

Three weeks later on August 20, the building looked like this…

The scaffolding has been removed on the south side where the brick work was being done at the top of the building.  In comparing photos, we can tell that the restructured brick was restored to its original look.

It’s interesting, too, that the two tall doors on the south side that had been boarded up for years have been removed.  It is also possible to see clear through the structure.  We can see that the building has been taken down to its studs.

Nine days later, on August 29, the building now looked like this…

It’s starting to come together, isn’t it?  The brick definitely looks refreshed, although the gray siding and gray painted front door still remain.

For comparison’s sake, let’s look at the earliest rendition of the building.  This 1913 postcard shows the structure shortly after it was built by H. E. Quindel in 1911 and after Charles Krueger began leasing it as a tavern/hotel.

Notice the large windows in the front and the multiple doors on both visible sides of the building.  Not only can we see the two doors on the diagonal but there are also two doors on the south side as well as two doors in the middle of the front facade.

Below is a photo of the building from the 1920s when it was called the Schaumburg Inn.  It still has the same look although it is interesting to note the steps that have been added to the front.  Clearly the road was graded and paved sometime between the two photos.  At this time Frank Lengl was the owner and was at the beginning of his 50 some-odd-year-tenure.  However, he had yet to paint the sign on the side of the building that advertised his chicken and steak dinners.

It will be interesting to watch as the final renovations emerge–both inside and out.  This historic building is a Contributing Structure in the village’s Olde Schaumburg Centre Historic District.  It’s wonderful to see that it remains an integral part of the heart of Schaumburg Township.

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

 

CAN YOU HELP WITH THIS RESTAURANT?

June 4, 2017

One of the readers of the blog posed a question this week asking about a restaurant his family frequented while he was growing up in Schaumburg Township.  This would have been in the 1980s or 1990s and, according to the reader, the restaurant was in the same location as the former La Magdalena which was at 216 W. Golf Road.  This is location of the current Ziegler Maserati dealership at the corner of Golf Road and Valley Lake Drive.

According to the reader, the restaurant served great burgers and steaks and, as a unique feature, showed silent, black and white movies in a back room.

The following restaurants were at this location beginning in the 1980s:

Ponderosa Steakhouse

Real Seafood Company (Opened in 1983)

Ristorante Chianti

Edwardo’s Pizza

La Magdalena

None of these rang a bell with the reader–or fit the bill as far as the menu was concerned.

I also suggested Ground Round as a possibility because their restaurants typically used the black and white movies as a gimmick.  The first Ground Round in Schaumburg was located on the west side of Roselle Road, between Higgins and Golf.  [Thank you to the commenters below for this tidbit.]  The second Ground Round was at 800 E. Golf Road on the northeast corner of Plum Grove and Golf and it closed sometime in late 1989 or early 1990.  The reader did not think these were the restaurant or the location.

Does this ring a bell with any of you readers?  What are we missing? If you have a suggestion, please make a comment or send me a quick email.  Both the reader and I would appreciate it. Thank you!

***************************************************************After reading the many comments below–and some that were sent to my email that duplicate the comments–the reader who posed the question thinks it probably has to be the Ground Round.  He definitely remembers the food and the movies and Ground Round is closest to that description.

Many thanks to those of you who contributed.  It is always nice to be able to appeal to the greater blog brain!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

Photo of La Magdalena used courtesy of http://travelingtproll.blogspot.com

 

MCDONALD’S, HOLLYWOOD AND SCHAUMBURG TOWNSHIP

January 29, 2017

mcdonalds

In the new biopic The Founder, there is a mention of Ray Kroc opening his first McDonald’s restaurants in the Chicago area.  One of the restaurants is the first one at 400 Lee Street in Des Plaines. This original location opened in April 1955 and the building has since been torn down and rebuilt.  But the movie also mentions other locations in Waukegan–and Schaumburg!

Curious about this connection, a patron emailed me about the beginnings of McDonald’s in Schaumburg Township, wondering if we were, in fact, one of the first locations in the Chicagoland area.

After doing a bit of research, I discovered that there were others in the area that opened earlier–Arlington Heights, Elk Grove Village and Wheeling–to name a few.  The first one in Schaumburg Township was the location on Golf Road, just east of the intersection with Higgins.  This restaurant held its grand opening on Saturday, October 17, 1970 (15 years after the Des Plaines location) when they opened to the public at 10 a.m.

Ronald McDonald was there in person to greet kids from 10 to noon and handed out free gifts.  Their ad from the October 16, 1970 Daily Herald mentions their “piping-hot 100% pure-beef hamburgers, golden brown french fries… and triple-thick chocolate, vanilla and strawberry shakes.”  A photo from the October 22 paper says that the grand opening drew over 4000 people!

Facing Golf Road, the facade and interior of the building were in the latest style of the day which had been developed in 1968 by the corporate office.  Having moved from the outdoor restaurant trend with the golden arches, the Schaumburg location featured a brick building with big windows and a mansard roof.  As noted in the comments below, there was also an interior playground that was used as a space for countless birthday parties.  The McDonald’s sign on Golf Road maintained the golden arches–just as they do today.

As one of the commenters noted, the original building was torn down about around 2002 and the replacement building was not only smaller but was resituated on the lot to accomodate for the heavy drive thru traffic.  The location had a great 46-year run but, unfortunately, closed in 2016 after a new store opened in the Golf Rose Center in Hoffman Estates.

mcdonalds-2

 

Many other locations exist in Schaumburg Township:

  • Barrington Square Mall on Higgins in Hoffman Estates
  • 2580 W. Golf Road near the intersection with Barrington Road in Hoffman Estates
  • 1070 Roselle Road in the Golf Rose Center in Hoffman Estates
  • 550 S. Roselle Road in the Farmgate Shopping Center in Schaumburg
  • 2545 Schaumburg Road in the Scharrington Square Shopping Center in Schaumburg
  • 720 E. Higgins Road at Plum Grove Road in Schaumburg
  • Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg
  • 775 E. Algonquin Road in Schaumburg between Harper College and Motorola
  • 955 E. Golf Road in Schaumburg (This is another brand new store as of 2016.)
  • 633 Meacham Road at Biesterfield in Strawberry Hill Plaza in Elk Grove Village
  • 7455 Barrington Road at Irving Park in Hanover Park

mcdonalds-uniformSo many of us worked for McDonald’s in the 1970’s wearing those polyester uniforms with the perky hats, frying hamburgers for a Big Mac, frying eggs in a six-sectioned egg ring for Egg McMuffins and actually mixing and whipping the shakes in a triple-head milkshake maker.  And let’s not forget making change in our heads at the cash register!  What are your memories of the McDonald’s in Schaumburg Township?  Did you work there?  Do you know when they opened?  What were your uniforms like?  Please feel free to share your thoughts!

Also, enjoy this story by Dann Gire of the Daily Herald as he discusses the appearance of the Schaumburg and other Chicagoland McDonald’s in The Founder. 

 

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

The article, “The Browning of McDonald’s,” was gratefully used in the description of the first McDonald’s in Schaumburg.

 

TWO LOCATIONS OF CHICKEN UNLIMITED NOW SERVING UNLIMITED CHICKEN!

January 15, 2017

It seems a bit of a fried chicken craze hit Schaumburg Township in the early 1970’s.  Kentucky Fried Chicken had already paved the way in Hoffman Estates in the late 1960s when they opened a brand new restaurant at Higgins and Roselle Roads.   In 1970 Ray and Geri Herringer opened a Chicken Unlimited franchise at 10 N. Roselle Road.  [Daily Herald, April 26, 1971]  This was followed by another Chicken Unlimited franchise that opened in July 1972 on Higgins Road.  In addition, Brown’s Chicken decided to join the competition with their restaurant at 620 S. Roselle Road in September.

In the July 12, 1972 issue of the Daily Herald, an ad invited the public to the grand opening of Chicken Unlimited’s Schaumburg stores at 805 W. Higgins Road and at 10 N. Roselle Road. The Higgins Road store was at the intersection of Higgins and Golf and the Roselle Road store was in this small strip mall that was on the northwest side of the intersection of Schaumburg and Roselle Roads.

Library

When they came to town they brought not only “the world’s best fried chicken” but fish & chips, giant Whamburgers, fried shrimp and hot apple puffs.  Yum!  And, to celebrate the opening of the stores, they offered a “Get Acquainted Coupon” that featured 12 pieces of light, crispy chicken, french fries, cole slaw, hot rolls and honey.  All for the low price of $3.99.  Certainly enough to feed a family of five or six!

The Herringers also offered a package deal for catering purposes.  It was called “Parties Unlimited” and featured a package of chicken, salad, rolls, plates, knives and forks.

Yet another ad from a November 1973 mailer stated that the stores were open 7 days a week, beginning at 11 a.m.  It also featured this coupon for a fast way to save a buck.

chicken-unlimited

Unfortunately, though, Chicken Unlimited did not last long. On March 30, 1976, the franchise filed for bankruptcy and it was around this time that the restaurants shut down in Schaumburg.  The last time there was an appearance in the Daily Herald for one of the Schaumburg locations was in 1976, although ads for the Palatine and Elk Grove locations appeared into the later 70’s.

Maybe one of our readers worked at one of the restaurants or remembers when they closed?  If you can clue us in, it would be most appreciated!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

CAN YOU HELP WITH THIS RESTAURANT?

December 11, 2016

Question markOne of the readers of this blog posed a question this week, asking about a restaurant that was on Algonquin Road in Schaumburg in the late 1970s.

He was a young Motorola interviewee at the time and his future boss took him to a family type of restaurant on Algonquin Road that was between Meacham and Route 53.  It was on the north side of Algonquin and, to the best of his recall, was between Lancer’s at 1450 E. Algonquin and the Frankly Yours West Hot Dog stand at 1580 E. Algonquin.

I looked in the 1982 phone book that was donated to our library and is the closest we have to that time period.  I tracked all of the restaurants in the yellow pages and the only ones that came up were Lancer’s, La Margarita at 1626 E. Algonquin and Magas at 1941 E. Algonquin.  We can pretty much discount all of these since one has been mentioned, another is a Mexican restaurant and the other is on the wrong side of the road.

The reader suspects it was possibly near today’s Wendy’s, if not actually on that site.  Wendy’s address is 1530 E. Algonquin which is pretty darned close.

What are we missing?  If you have a possible answer, please put in a comment or send me a quick email.  I’ll be happy to post an answer!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

BEING A KID IN HOFFMAN ESTATES!

April 10, 2016

Our guest contributor this week is Pat Barch, the Hoffman Estates Historian.  This column originally appeared in the March 2016 issue of the Hoffman Estates Citizen, the village’s newsletter.  The column appears here, courtesy of the Village of Hoffman Estates.

There were so many fun things to do for children growing up in Hoffman Estates in the early years of the village.

With so much construction going on in the neighborhoods, starting in 1955 and continuing into the 70’s, there were always those wonderful piles of dirt the seemed to draw the kids like magnets.  But our early town had so many fun places to go to.

During the cold days of winter everyone could go ice skating on their local pond.  Some had warming houses to help take the frost from their frozen feet.  If you had enough guys, you could get a hockey game going.  With enough snow on the ground, you could head over to Fleetwing Farm on Central Rd. and go tubing with your friends.

Hoffman LanesHoffman Lanes bowling alley was a busy place for both adults and children.  The adult bowling leagues were filled with moms & dads who enjoyed the competition & the opportunity to meet others.   Saturday afternoons found the kids really getting into their own bowling competitions.

When the Thunderbird Movie Theater opened in the Golf Rose Shopping Center in the early 60’s, the kids headed to the Sunday matinees and gave their parents a few hours of peace and quiet.  Snyder Drugs was right next door to the theater and a great place to buy your candy.

A favorite eating place that the kids really enjoyed was Ground Round on Golf Rd.  Where else could you eat all those peanuts and not get scolded for throwing the shells on the floor?  The burgers were awesome as I remember.  Lum’s Hot Dogs on Golf Rd. was another great place.  Everyone liked the idea that the dogs were steamed in beer.  They tasted great.

In the 70s the hang out that Hoffman High kids liked was Barrington Square.  You could see a dollar movie at the Barrington Square Movie Theater, stop in for a slice of pizza at Garabaldi’s Restaurant and check out the latest albums at Flip Side.  Lines would form outside Flip Side for tickets to the hottest concerts.  A great hang out for the Conant kids was Hippo’s Hot Dogs on Higgins and Plum Grove Roads. They had the best Chicago style hot dog around. Hippos

Fireside_ArenaFireside Roller Rink on Roselle & Higgins, the world’s largest indoor rink, was one of the most popular places in town.  The local schools always had skating parties throughout the year. You never missed one.  They were a blast.

As the kids grew older, they were treated to more great entertainment at the Poplar Creek Music Theater.  In the 80s the 20,000 seat open air theater offered great performances by the most popular entertainers of the day.  Located at Route 59 and the Tollway, the theater is fondly remembered by everyone who enjoyed the music under the stars.

It is all gone except Garabaldi’s Restaraunt.  It’s fun to remember those days.  What do you remember?

Pat Barch
Hoffman Estates Village Historian
eagle2064@comcast.net

A HOT RESTAURANT SPOT ON GOLF ROAD

October 4, 2015

 

Champps 1

 

What happens when a Green Bay Packer starts a Mexican restaurant chain and it eventually grows to 210 locations?  The answer:  one of those locations finds its way to Schaumburg.

In 1975 former Packers great, Max McGee, started the restaurant chain, Chi Chi’s, in Richfield, Minnesota with restaurateur, Marno McDermott.  The popularity of the eatery grew to the point that the chain decided to open a spot at 955 E. Golf Road in Schaumburg in 1984.  [Classified ads began appearing in the Daily Herald in the summer of 1984 advertising for help wanted.  This is also the first year Chi-Chi’s is listed in the local phone book.]

The building, as I recall, was a light tan stucco and served up standard Mexican fare of enchiladas, tacos and chimichangas.  They had banquet facilities and offered carry-out service.  Unfortunately, the restaurant that advertised itself in the 1986 phone book as “When You Feel A Little Mexican,” closed three years later in 1987.

The building and the spot did not languish for long.  By November of the same year, an Italian chain by the name of Grisanti’s had remodeled and opened in the same building.  According to a review in the December 18, 1987 issue of the Daily Herald, “the exterior has been totally redone with a Mediterranean accent.”  The interior had a “an airy main room” that was terraced “with canopies and plants in large terra-cotta pots.”

It was a popular spot for many years with the highlights being the salad that was tossed tableside with fresh ground Romano cheese and the “warm, soft loaf of Tuscan bread brushed with garlic butter.”  They served lunch and dinner every day as well as a brunch on Sunday.  It was reasonably priced and endured a nine year run, closing in late 1996.

The following year, on November 17, 1997, Champps’ Restaurant & Bar opened in the newly renovated building that featured additional outdoor seating.  [Daily Herald; November 5, 1997]  They were part of the Champps Entertainment chain based in Minneapolis that caught the early curve of sports-themed restaurants and bars.  Champps 2

This restaurant too proved to be a hit, serving up a varied American-style menu and providing plenty of large screen TVs for lots of sports viewing.  They lasted for nearly 18 years and recently closed their doors.

The building was scheduled to be demolished in August 2015 to prepare the site for another restaurant.  This time it’s a brand new McDonalds.  So, get ready for a new place to stop in or drive thru for your Big Mac and fries because this spot was obviously destined for restaurants!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

 

NIGHTCLUBS OF SCHAUMBURG TOWNSHIP

April 5, 2015

Just as the band Cheap Trick was getting its start in nearby Rockford in 1973, the B. Ginnings nightclub of Schaumburg came along to give them a stage.  Opening in 1974, B. Ginnings was begun by Danny Seraphine, the drummer for the band Chicago.  This wonderful photo, passed on to me by blog reader, Larry Rowan, shows the sign for Woodfield Commons.  If you’re wondering where the nightclub was, just put yourself in the Secretary of State’s Drivers License facility on Golf Road.  You’d be standing in the middle of it.B ginnings

Other nightclubs have also had their heyday in Schaumburg Township.  Some had dancing, some had live music and some were just a great place to spend a weekend night to see and be seen. Confetti could be found at 1850 E. Golf Road, adjacent to the Hyatt Hotel.They offered a complimentary dinner buffet, Ladies Night, had a dress code and stipulated that you had to be 21 with proper ID.

There was Studebaker’s which could also be found in Woodfield Commons.   It had a good-sized dance floor with music that leaned towards classic rock and roll.  It was opened by Walter Payton and a group of investors who followed on the heels of that success with another venture–Thirty Fours.  This bar opened in 1988 and closed in 1995 at the same location as Confetti.  It was very popular and had a great dance floor too.  After the closure in 1995 it reopened as Phroggs and had the same amenities as Confetti except that it was necessary to be 23 to enter.  A later incarnation was called the Living Room.  Hot location, wouldn’t you say?

Of course, there was also the Snuggery on Algonquin Road which was a huge hit during the 1980s and into the 1990s.  Further east on Algonquin, near Rte. 53 was La Margarita.  They were known for their Mexican food but became a nightclub in the evening and were open until 4 a.m.   There was also the Bamboo Room on Golf Road between Roselle and Plum Grove.  It closed in 2007 and became Heat.

Maybe you can remember others that were your hot spots?  Or that came earlier in the 1970s?  Please share any I’ve missed.  And, if you’re interested in a nice history of B. Ginnings, check it out here.

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library

 

REMEMBERING THE GOOD PLACES TO EAT IN HOFFMAN ESTATES

August 10, 2014

Our guest contributor this week is Pat Barch, the Hoffman Estates Historian.  This column originally appeared in the June 2014 issue of the Hoffman Estates Citizen, the village’s newsletter.  The column appears here, courtesy of the Village of Hoffman Estates.

With the closing of Burger King on Higgins and Roselle Rd, I’m reminded of so many of the restaurants we’ve had in our downtown area in the vicinity of Higgins, Roselle and Golf.  Please help with some you may remember by e-mailing me the places you ate at. Burger King

You’ll have to forgive me if I also include some places in Schaumburg, in the Higgins, Roselle & Golf  part of town we seem to be half in  Schaumburg and half in Hoffman Estates.  Some time you’re not sure what town you’re in.

As I look at my list I realize how many are gone.  Do you remember Derby Street on the southeast corner of Golf and Roselle Rd.  How about Cals Roast Beef on Higgins Rd. just west of Spring Mill Rd. They used to have a huge steer out in front.  It later became Arby’s.  Who remembers The Ground Round? That location has seen many different restaurants. At one time we had Naugles.  It had really good Mexican food.  That same location had a really nice restaurant called Spring Garden.  It had every kind of food you could think of from breakfasts to dinners and ice cream sundaes and sodas.  Do you know what’s there now?  It’s the Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant on the west side of Roselle just north of the Walgreens at Roselle and Higgins.  I think the first one was Ground Round followed by the others.

Another location was originally a small grocery store but became the Amber-Rose Inn, later to become Caesar’s Pizza, one of the best loved pizzas in Schaumburg and Hoffman Estates.  It was torn down and the most recent building is a doctors building (on the north side of Higgins Rd. just east of the intersection of Higgins and Golf).  You’ll find Dunkin Dounuts and a drive up coffee shop in this area.  That’s Schaumburg territory.

Other fun places to eat that are now gone were up and down Golf Rd.  I’m sure you haven’t forgotten Barnaby’s nor Dover Straits.  They’re some of the most recent to go.  These have been long gone.  Do you remember any of them?  Lums with hot dogs steamed in beer, Steak and Shake that became Entenmanns Bakery (that’s gone too), the Black Pearl, Arthur Treacher’s Fish & Chips or Baker’s Square.Matchbook 8

If you’ve lived here a long time and grew up with these restaurants, you’ll probably remember Hippo’s.  It was located in Schaumburg at Plum Grove Rd and Higgins.  It was here for many years but we have a McDonalds on that spot now.  Before Hippo’s built their restaurant, they started out as a hot dog wagon or truck at the Shell station that was located at the intersection of Higgins and Route 53 when there was a 4 way stop, no traffic lights, no Woodfield either.

One thing for sure, we never had a hard time finding a place to eat.

I hope you’re planning on coming to our Museum program on Sept. 27th from 1 till 2:30 pm in the village hall.  We’re calling it “Growing Up in Hoffman Estates or What I didn’t tell my Mom”.  We want to hear all the naughty things you did as a kid in Hoffman Estates during the 50s, 60s, 70s and more recently. Bring a friend who was your cohort.   We’ll have birthday cake for our 55th anniversary and share lots of good stories, ones that will curl you mother’s hair.   E-mail me at eagle2064@comcast.net if you can come.

Pat Barch
Hoffman Estates Village Historian
eagle2064@comcast.net