Archive for the ‘Hanover Park’ Category

THE TRADEWINDS SHOPPING CENTER OF HANOVER PARK

April 9, 2017

The year 1968 was a big one for Hanover Park.  Anne Fox School opened.  A new fire station on Maple Street opened.  And, commercially speaking, the village’s largest business venture opened as the Tradewinds Shopping Center.

In 1967 3H Building Corporation purchased the Melvin Lichthardt farm that stood at the northeast corner of Irving Park and Barrington Roads.  [From Camelot to Metropolis, Ralph Feeley, 1976]  Development began shortly thereafter, and in 1968 the $3.5 million,  200,000 square foot shopping center opened.  [Chain Store Age]

It wasn’t until 1969 that Dominick’s and Zayre, the two large anchors, opened.  Zayre opened October 8 in 80,000 square feet while Dominicks, with Bob Johnson as the manager, opened December 13 in a 30,000 square foot store that eventually expanded to 65,000 square feet.

The ad for Dominicks described it as “a truly modern and beautiful food store that was created and designed to make shopping an adventure, a pleasurable experience, the last word in exceptional convenience.”  Given away that day were 40 bushels of groceries, gifts, balloons, piggy banks, and aprons and nylons for the ladies.

The shopping center really came into its own on July 6, 1973 (per commenter Dan, below) when the Tradewinds Cinema I and II opened as twin theaters. During those intervening years between 1968 and 1973, the shopping center had boomed with the following stores:

  • Walgreens
  • Peter Pan Cleaners
  • Hanover Park Interior Lighting
  • Hanover Fabrics (November 1970)
  • Lincoln Realty
  • Tri-Village Realty

Outbuildings in the shopping center included the First State Bank & Trust Company of Hanover Park and, more popularly, the St. George and The Dragon restaurant.  This was the third restaurant in the old English-themed chain that featured pickles and peanuts at every table.

The shopping center eventually included the Hanover Park branch of the Schaumburg Township District Library, Ames and later Value City Furniture that took over the Zayre space, Rahl Jewelers, Hallmark and Radio Shack.

Unfortunately, during the first decade of the 2000’s the shopping center began to decline.  Dominick’s pulled out sometime between 2002 and 2005.  The theaters also closed during this time period.  Then, in a double whammy in 2006, the library moved to its new branch on Irving Park Road and Menards purchased the entire shopping center property for about $9 million in preparation for their new store that stands there today.

This perpetually busy corner, with the Tradewinds Shopping Center as its anchor, was a go-to spot for anyone living in Hanover Park for many years.  Many stores came and went over the years besides those listed above.  Can you help complete the list?  Send in your comments or email me at the address below and I’ll add them as they come in.  Thanking you in advance for your inclusions!

Other businesses in the Tradewinds Shopping Center:

  • Blockbuster Video in the outlot on the corner
  • B. Dalton bookstore in the Library location before the library
  • Collin’s Fireplace and Patio
  • Corky’s lunch counter in the Walgreens
  • Full House (formerly St. George and The Dragon)
  • Hair Cuttery
  • Hit or Miss
  • Leslie’s Pool Supplies
  • Rent-A-Center
  • Star Cleaners
  • Swanson’s Crafts and Hobbies (Jack Swanson, proprietor)
  • Toni’s Conversation Clothes

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

[The photos were taken by the library prior to the Hanover Park branch moving into the shopping center in 1993.]

THE BEGINNING OF THE HANOVER HIGHLAND SUBDIVISION

December 8, 2013

This article is published courtesy of the Hanover Park Hi-Lighter, November-December 2013.  Information provided by:  Ralph Kanehl.  The Editor in Chief, Regina Mullen, graciously allowed us to republish the article in this blog.

A Bit of Hanover Park History:  Hanover Highland

The Kingston 400

In 1962 the Village Board approved a plat of subdivision for Hanover Highlands.  Six model homes were built south of Walnut Avenue on Valley View Drive.  Basic home prices, before options, ranged from $14,995 to $19,995.

The Monticello 500

Interest rates for a conventional 24 year mortgage started at 6 1/4% with 20% down for a monthly payment of $94.00, including taxes and insurance.  A 29 year mortgage started at 6 1/2 % interest with 3 1/4% down for a monthly payment of $117.50, including taxes and insurance.

The Holiday 100

When completed Hanover Highland was home to 370 families and a new school, Hanover Highlands Elementary School.

Imperial 410

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library