TWO LOCATIONS OF CHICKEN UNLIMITED NOW SERVING UNLIMITED CHICKEN!

January 15, 2017

It seems a bit of a fried chicken craze hit Schaumburg Township in the early 1970’s.  Kentucky Fried Chicken had already paved the way in Hoffman Estates in the late 1960s when they opened a brand new restaurant at Higgins and Roselle Roads.   In 1970 Ray and Geri Herringer opened a Chicken Unlimited franchise at 10 N. Roselle Road.  [Daily Herald, April 26, 1971]  This was followed by another Chicken Unlimited franchise that opened in July 1972 and Brown’s Chicken decided to join the competition with a restaurant at 620 S. Roselle Road in September.

In the July 12, 1972 issue of the Daily Herald, an ad invited the public to the grand opening of Chicken Unlimited’s Schaumburg stores at 805 W. Higgins Road and at 10 N. Roselle Road. The Higgins Road store was at the intersection of Higgins and Golf and the Roselle Road store was in this small strip mall that was on the northwest side of the intersection of Schaumburg and Roselle Roads.

Library

When they came to town they brought not only “the world’s best fried chicken” but fish & chips, giant Whamburgers, fried shrimp and hot apple puffs.  Yum!  And, to celebrate the opening of the stores, they offered a “Get Acquainted Coupon” that featured 12 pieces of light, crispy chicken, french fries, cole slaw, hot rolls and honey.  All for the low price of $3.99.  Certainly enough to feed a family of five or six!

The Herringers also offered a package deal for catering purposes.  It was called “Parties Unlimited” and featured a package of chicken, salad, rolls, plates, knives and forks.

Yet another ad from a November 1973 mailer stated that the stores were open 7 days a week, beginning at 11 a.m.  It also featured this coupon for a fast way to save a buck.

chicken-unlimited

Unfortunately, though, Chicken Unlimited did not last long. On March 30, 1976, the franchise filed for bankruptcy and it was around this time that the restaurants shut down in Schaumburg.  The last time there was an appearance in the Daily Herald for one of the Schaumburg locations was in 1976, although ads for the Palatine and Elk Grove locations appeared into the later 70’s.

Maybe one of our readers worked at one of the restaurants or remembers when they closed?  If you can clue us in, it would be most appreciated!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

CAN YOU HELP IDENTIFY THIS PHOTO?

January 8, 2017

 

unidentified-woodfield-mall

This photo has been in our collection for quite a while and it is a puzzler.  The back of the photo says, “Once Upon a Time” and is dated 03/04/81.

Upon first glance, it seems it might be Woodfield Mall, due to the amount of open space and the size of the project.  The background is what throws that supposition off.  Even though there appears to be a farm in the middle background of the photo, there is also a hint of a neighborhood in the upper left of the photo.  And that was simply not the case in the area that surrounded Woodfield prior to construction.  An aerial photo of that locale in 1969, before construction began, would have shown only farmfields, houses, barns and outbuildings in a checker board pattern.  There would not have been a grid layout of streets and houses anywhere close.

It also appears that the area was excavated, given what looks to be an accentuated incline that runs behind the building.  It is also curious that there are a couple of buildings in the foreground of the photo.  One appears to be a barn and there is a type of drive-thru garage to the left with two construction trailers in between.  Interestingly, there is a power pole behind the garage.  Which begs the question, were these buildings there before development began and then incorporated into the construction site?

I strongly suspect this is not Woodfield.  Is it even Schaumburg Township?  The only other clue is that the photo came to us with a collection of other local and regional photos.  Sooooo, it could be another suburb.  Do any of you have a clue?

***Photo identified!  In addition to the comments from JKunzer below, I also received an email–with photos attached–from another reader of the blog explaining why this is Stratford Square Mall under construction.  Through their views it is not only possible to compare the basic shape of the building in the photo to an aerial of it on today’s Google Satellite, but both commenters agreed that the angular walls along the berm are, in fact, near the rather unique northwest mall entrance that is between Kohl’s and Macy’s.

And, as local realtor Bob Dohn noted, the mall opened in 1981 which makes the date on the back of the photo even more relevant.

JKunzer also mentioned that the farm is the current Bloomingdale Walk town homes.

Leslie Drewitz, Maretta Britt and Abby Budznynski of the Bloomingdale Public Library graciously assisted me too, and passed the photo back with identifications tabbed all over it.   You can see their handiwork below.

stratford-sq-aerial-labeled-under-construction-docx

Some of the details they provided are:

  • The farm in the background of the photo is the Benders Sod Farm which is, as JKunzer said, today’s Bloomingdale Walk town homes.
  • The diagonal corner behind the farm, in the very background of the photo is the corner of Schick Road and Springfield Drive.   Springfield is just a dirt road that runs to the right.  Schick Road is the diagonal road that runs to the left of the photo and separates the farm and the subdivision.
  • Abilene Trail is the road running through the subdivsion.
  • The road at the left middle part of the photo is the Entrance Drive to the mall that is emptying into the excavated property.
  • The far left portion of the mall being excavated is today’s Carsons.  Montgomery Ward’s/Burlington Coat Factory is in the undeveloped portion in the very forefront of the photo.  The closed J.C. Penney portion is in the right forefront.
  • The left portion of the skeletal structure is Sears lower level and the right portion is Kohl’s lower level.  Macy’s undeveloped lower level is on the far right of the photo.
  • In the very middle of the photo, above where two sections of the berm meet, is the location of the current Cinemark Century Theater.

 

All of the clues provided by contributors were a big help in determining the photo’s subject and the many details in the photo.  Many thanks to all of the commenters for their analysis and the identification methods they used to determine the identity of the photo.  Your collective brains are always much appreciated!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

THE LION BRIDGE IN HOFFMAN ESTATES

January 1, 2017

Our guest contributor this week is Pat Barch, the Hoffman Estates Historian.  This column originally appeared in the December 2016 issue of the Hoffman Estates Citizen, the village’s newsletter.  The column appears here, courtesy of the Village of Hoffman Estates.

Lion Bridge

Finally, after so many years of trying to find out who built the Lion Bridge, I now know who engineered that beautiful little bridge. His name was Harry L. Emerson, an engineer who worked for Cook County back at the turn of the century. Not only did he build our Lion Bridge but he built the first reinforced concrete arch bridges in Cook County. Seven of them were across the Des Plaines River.

According to his biography in the History of Cook County dated 1909, his two most notable bridges were built in Wheeling and Lemont, Illinois. They also had animals on them and the Lemont, or Stevens St. Bridge, built in 1906, was so beautiful that it was a destination point for visitors to the Chicago area. The bridge in Wheeling, or the Dundee Rd. Bridge, built in 1905, was identical to our Lion Bridge only longer in its span across the Des Plaines River. The Stevens St. Bridge was torn down and the Dundee Rd. Bridge was widened and the Lions and decorative outlining of the bridge were destroyed in the process. All that’s left are the photos found on line and at the Wheeling Historical Society.

I have to thank Randy Schallau who found the name of engineer Harry L.Emerson while doing research into the mystery of who built the bridge. Randy had lived in Hanover Park at one time and had read about our difficulty in finding any information about the bridge. Research is a hobby of his as he’s retired from his work in construction and living in the north woods of Wisconsin. He knew that bids for work in the construction of buildings, roads or bridges could be found in the Engineering News that dated back to the late 1800s. He located me and e-mailed what he had found. That was a great day. After all the years of finding nothing in newspapers or government records, we finally found who had built the bridge. The request for bids for the Lion Bridge and the Stevens St. Bridge in Lemont were in the same issue of Engineering News from 1906.

As far as we know, none of Mr. Emerson’s original bridges remain except for the Lion Bridge located at the southeast corner of Route 59 and Golf Rd. It is already recognized as a historic bridge but I’m now in the difficult process of applying for National Register status. More research is required and with a bridge that’s 110 years old, it’s a time consuming process with little to be found.

Old maps from 1890 show that there was a cheese factory and the Bode Hotel located at the northwest corner of Bode Rd and Sutton Rd (now Route 59). Golf Rd did not exist in 1906 when the Lion Bridge was built. It was an important bridge because dairy farmers would take Sutton Rd across Poplar Creek on the Lion Bridge to Bode Rd stopping at the cheese factory or on to Elgin. Known as the Elgin to Chicago Rd, Bode Rd. is one of the oldest roads in this area. Farmers would take Bode Rd to Elgin with wagons loaded with milk bound for the dairies in Elgin.

Please join us on Saturday, Dec. 3 at 10 am at the Lion Bridge to celebrate its 110th birthday. A small parking area is located at the north east corner or Bode Rd and Route 59 and we’ll tailgate with coffee and donuts, walk down to the bridge and sing happy birthday to our much loved bridge.

Pat Barch, Hoffman Estates Village Historian
eagle2064@comcast.net

THE BOTTERMAN GARAGE AND THE HATTENDORF STORE IN THE HEART OF SCHAUMBURG TOWNSHIP

December 25, 2016

trinity-lutheran

Over the years, we have obtained cookbooks from various churches, schools and organizations of Schaumburg Township.  They are an interesting snapshot of the home culture of the day and also provide us with names of the local cooks.  This cookbook from Trinity Lutheran Church in Roselle was passed on to me not too long ago and was published sometime between 1936 and 1942.

While it has interesting recipes like Spinach Mold, Creamed Kohlrabi and Ham Tiffle, there were a fair amount of recipes from some of the German farm families of Schaumburg Township.  The names were recognizable and it was interesting to note the variety of recipes and ponder how many of the dishes are still in the cooking repertoires of those families.

Also included in the pages of the cookbook are ads from various local businesses–most of which were Roselle-based businesses. However, two Schaumburg Township businesses were also listed and, not surprisingly, both were located at the intersection of Roselle and Schaumburg roads.botterman-garage

The first was Schaumburg Garage, owned by Al Botterman.  In the book Genesis of A Township, Marilyn Lind notes that in 1936, “The garage at Schaumburg Center was now being operated by Albert Botterman” and then in 1942, “In March, Albert Botterman decided to sell his garage because rationing of tires and gas would cut down his business.”  She derived these details from The Herald and they help confirm the time frame of the cookbook itself.  The 1940 census also confirms Mr. Botterman’s employment by stating that he was “manager of service garage.”

Botterman’s Garage (as it was known by the locals) was directly to the south of the current Lou Malnati’s on Roselle Road.  According to an article from the Roselle Register (May 14, 1959), the building was dated as a “45-year-old garage.”  We can then derive its origin as circa 1914.  This photo of the garage was taken around 1928 during an earlier ownership.  Roselle Road is in the foreground.

botterman-garage-2

Mr. Botterman did auto repairs at the garage but never sold gasoline even though the above quote from The Herald implies that.  (Not only were there were not visible gas pumps outside of the garage, but this fact was also noted by a few of our oral historians.)

Part of the building must have been parceled off to Lake Cook Farm Supply around 1938 when they came to Schaumburg Township.  The Daily Herald states the Farm Supply’s location thusly: “The building was an old barn where Botterman did auto repair work.  Lake Cook supplied farms with bulk feed, fuel oil and gasoline.”  (Daily Herald, November 10, 1938)
2572

In 1957 Lake Cook Farm Supply built this low building for their retail location.  If you remember this building next to today’s Lou Malnati’s, it is a bit confusing to imagine a garage in between the two.  It is important to keep in mind that in 1957 the intersection of Schaumburg and Roselle Roads was much smaller, with only two lanes in both directions.

The garage remained in between the Farm Supply and Niemann’s Tavern (Lou Malnati’s) on the corner until May 1959 when it burned down.  The Roselle Register article states that the “two-story frame garage” was “two doors away from the intersection of Roselle and Schaumburg rds.”  The fire leveled the garage in an hour.  With the open space created, this is what made it possible to move today’s Lou Malnati’s when the intersection was widened in 1980.  The tavern was then moved 35 feet to the south and east.

A few doors down from Bottermans was the other business mentioned in the cookbook–Hattendorf’s Grocery.

hattendorfs

Herman Hattendorf opened a small grocery store on Roselle Road in 1932 in a house that had been owned by Alma and Frank Lengl.  Mr. Lengl was the nephew of Frank Lengl who was the proprietor of Lengl’s Schaumburg Inn, which is today’s Easy Street Pub.

When opened, the grocery store was small in scope but carried enough basic products to satisfy the farmers who were the main shoppers.  As one of our oral historians mentioned, the locals would often bring in eggs to barter with.  If she brought in one extra above the normal dozen, she was allowed the delight of picking out a piece of candy.

It is also interesting to note that, in Genesis of a Township, Mrs. Lind also notes that Herman and Clara Hattendorf delivered groceries by truck throughout the township.  In essence, it was an early Peapod!

Considering that this was the height of the depression, Mr. Hattendorf managed to stay afloat and even had the store repainted “a combination of white and green.” [Cook County Herald, September 30, 1938]  Because it was a brick building, the story must have been referring to the interior.  You can get an idea of the size of the store from this rear view photo that shows the store being torn down in 1982.

1560

In 1940 though, Mr. Hattendorf was prosperous enough to buy the former Schaumburg Bank building that was on the northeast corner of Schaumburg and Roselle Roads as a new location for his store.  The sale was announced in the January 19 issue of the Cook County Herald and said that Mr. Hattendorf planned to spend $3000 to remodel the interior of the building and even purchased additional ground to provide parking.  The grand opening was set for March 1 and 2.  Interestingly, the article also states “the store at that time will be converted to the self-serve type.”  This implies that in the old store, prior to the move, a list was given to Mr. Hattendorf and he collected the goods for the shopper–in an old-fashioned general store sort of way.

And, on March 1 and 2, the new version of Hattendorf’s Grocery opened.  Included in the new store was a “complete, fresh meat department…  Goods are being attractively and conveniently arranged so that you will find it delightful to serve yourself.”   [Cook County Herald, March 1, 1940]

hattendorf-store-ad

The grocery store was in existence through at least 1943, but it has been difficult to determine when it closed.  Suffice to say, it was a draw for the locals of Schaumburg Township and, obviously, a convenient store to have in the area.  If you can provide any details, please provide a comment or send me an email.

You never know what can be found in an old book and how it can trigger an investigation into our local history!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

SCHAUMBURG THROUGH THE DECADES: A MONTHLY LOOK BACK

December 20, 2016

During Schaumburg’s 60th anniversary year of 2016, we will take a look back at the Schaumburg  you’ve known for the last six decades.  Every month there will be a posting on 3 village happenings for each decade the village has been in existence.  Maybe you remember some of the events and have something more to add to a few of the items?  Send in your comments!

60 Years Ago in 1956

  • Pure Oil gained approval from the Cook County Zoning Board of Appeals at a hearing at Schaumburg School to change the zoning on their property from farming to business use.  The 62-acre tract would scheduled to hold a new office that would accomodate 1000-2000 potential employees.Pure Oil
  • 100 young 4-H’rs were in attendance at Schaumburg School for the Schaumburg 4-H Agricultural Club’s achievement night and Christmas party.
  • The home of Mrs. Minnie Kastning that was across Roselle Road from the Turret House, burned to the ground Monday, December 10.  Mrs. Kastning was rescued from the home by firemen who were alerted to the fire at 2 A.M. by a passing motorist.

50 Years Ago in 1966

  • The Illinois State Chamber of Commerce announced that the three largest new building facilities in Illinois for the year 1966 were the $395 million dollar accelerator being built at Fermilab, the nearly $30 million dollar foundry being built at Silvis and the 674,000 square foot Motorola plant.  The latter was the largest facility being built under one roof.
  • Final approval was given by the District 54 board to purchase and install 5 mobile classrooms in the district.  They were expected to alleviate crowding at Fairview, Campanelli and Hillcrest schools.
  • The Schaumburg Jaycees were selling Christmas trees, wreaths and accessories at the Weathersfield Commons shopping center at Schaumburg and Springinsguth Roads on Saturdays and Sundays before the holiday.  In addition, Santa was expected to be there to greet the kids!  (The photo below shows Weathersfield Commons at a later date when the Jewel Food Store had been moved from its first location.  When the shopping center opened–and when the Jaycees sold their Christmas trees in 1966–it was originally located where the True Value is at the back of this photo.)weathersfield-commons

40 Years Ago in 1976

  • In a Chicago Tribune article on Woodfield at Christmas, a variety of stores were mentioned:  Two-Plus-Two Jewelry, Sears Roebuck, Puppy Palace, McDonalds, I-Natural Cosmetics and J. C. Penney.  The same article stated that the mall was so crowded during the season that employees parked at Pure Oil and were shuttled across Golf Road to the shopping center.
  • The a capella quintet named Stormy Weather was scheduled to perform on December 19 at B’Ginnings, the Schaumburg nightclub on Golf Road.  They were noted for performing “doo-wop” or “street corner” singing.
  • The Chicago Tribune reviewed a new Asian restaurant in the Woodfield Commons Plaza at Golf Road and National Parkway called Fu-Lama Gardens.  They offered not only Chinese cuisine but Szechuan, Japanese, Polynesian, Cantonese, Mandarin and Indian specialties.

30 Years Ago in 1986

  • At their new store at 130 W. Golf Road in Schaumburg, CompuMat was featuring “the most advanced personal computer in the world.”  It was a Compaq Deskpro 386.
  • The Woodfield Plitt Theatres were showing the following movies at the beginning of December:  An American Tail, Star Trek IV, Peggy Sue Got Married, The Nutcracker, Children of a Lesser God, Firewalker, Crocodile Dundee, The Color of Money and Something Wild.
  • The following older subdivisions were targeted for street lights in the near future:  Lexington Fields Estates, Meadow Knolls and Pleasant Acres.  An increase in vehicle sticker fees was being considered as a way to pay for the lighting.

20 Years Ago in 1996

  • It was announced that the Winkelhake Farm on the southeast corner of Higgins and Plum Grove Road would be sold for development to Cambridge Homes.  The property was the last farm in Schaumburg and had been owned by the Winkelhake family since the original land grant purchase in 1846.winkelhake-farm
  • Medieval Times decided to freshen up their act a bit by garbing their knights in armor instead of chain mail and adding a court sorcerer, new pyrotechnics, high-powered stereo system and new bright and colorful costumes.  The business opened its first castle in 1983 in Kissimmee, FL.
  • The Schaumburg Sister Cities Commission planned to send a group of health care professionals to the sister city of Schaumburg, Germany to view their country’s outlook and practices in the medical field.

10 Years Ago in 2006

  • Santa Claus was temporarily kept from his chair in Woodfield’s Central Court for an entire day when a decoration suspended from the ceiling caught fire in the early morning hours of December 11.  He was back in place the following day.
  • Elio’s Pizza at 977 W. Wise Road was having their grand opening special and offering 50% off any pizza or pasta on Tuesdays.
  • The Village of Schaumburg began a new, annual tradition of selling a Christmas ornament that depicts a local establishment.  The tradition was established as part of the village’s 50th anniversary celebration and the first ornament design was the Turret House on Schaumburg Road.Turret House

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

The photo of the Weathersfield Commons Shopping Center is used courtesy of  the former Profile Publications of Crystal Lake.
The photo of the Winkelhake farm is used courtesy of Spring Valley.

The factual items for this blog posting were taken from stories that appeared in the Daily Herald and the Chicago Tribune.

 

 

 

CAN YOU HELP WITH THIS RESTAURANT?

December 11, 2016

Question markOne of the readers of this blog posed a question this week, asking about a restaurant that was on Algonquin Road in Schaumburg in the late 1970s.

He was a young Motorola interviewee at the time and his future boss took him to a family type of restaurant on Algonquin Road that was between Meacham and Route 53.  It was on the north side of Algonquin and, to the best of his recall, was between Lancer’s at 1450 E. Algonquin and the Frankly Yours West Hot Dog stand at 1580 E. Algonquin.

I looked in the 1982 phone book that was donated to our library and is the closest we have to that time period.  I tracked all of the restaurants in the yellow pages and the only ones that came up were Lancer’s, La Margarita at 1626 E. Algonquin and Magas at 1941 E. Algonquin.  We can pretty much discount all of these since one has been mentioned, another is a Mexican restaurant and the other is on the wrong side of the road.

The reader suspects it was possibly near today’s Wendy’s, if not actually on that site.  Wendy’s address is 1530 E. Algonquin which is pretty darned close.

What are we missing?  If you have a possible answer, please put in a comment or send me a quick email.  I’ll be happy to post an answer!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

THE FIRST ELECTION IN HOFFMAN ESTATES

December 4, 2016

Our guest contributor this week is Pat Barch, the Hoffman Estates Historian.  This column originally appeared in the November 2016 issue of the Hoffman Estates Citizen, the village’s newsletter.  The column appears here, courtesy of the Village of Hoffman Estates.

voteThe first election held in Hoffman Estates was November 7, 1959.  We had just voted for incorporation for the village in September and now the residents would go to the polls to elect a new village president and board of trustees.

Unlike the long drawn out political campaigning that goes on now, the early residents had only 6 weeks to learn about the candidates that would govern them for the next 4 years, very little time to make such important decisions.

The population of Hoffman Estates was only 8000 residents but that was a lot of door bells to rings and visits to be made to persuade neighbors and friends to vote for either the Good Government Party or the People’s Party.

It was decided that the elections would be non-partisan, neither Republican nor Democrat.  Both parties would rely on posters, flyers and newspapers to get their message across to so many in so little time.

Election Day finally arrived on November 7.  After three votes to incorporate, the early residents finally had a say in who would govern them and how they would govern themselves.  Now the democratic process would help them shape their future.

The residents of Hoffman Estates would choose Ed Pinger as President, Marilyn Brading as Clerk, James Gannon, Bruce Berger, Ed Deerfield, Ed Cunningham, John Pickering and Roy Jenkins as Trustees.  The Good Government Party had won the election.

On November 12, 1959 the first village board meeting was held.  It was the first of many and the beginning of the Village of Hoffman Estates.

Pat Barch
Hoffman Estates Village Historian
Eagle2064@comcast.net

BUYING A CAR IN SCHAUMBURG TOWNSHIP

November 27, 2016

Most people in Schaumburg Township know that Golf Road has always been the place to go car shopping.  And, if it’s not Golf Road itself, it’s darned close to Golf Road.

Part of what makes Golf Road so ideal is its easy-to-get-to location off of Route 53 and I-90.  Plus, it is a long stretch of road that winds through a fair number suburbs to the east and brings many car buyers to Schaumburg Township.  Hence, its earlier name–the Evanston-Elgin Road–as it used to be called.Franklin Weber

When someone recently suggested a blog posting on the car dealerships of Schaumburg Township, I thought I’d start a list that readers could contribute to.  After combing through various phone books dating back to 1982, I’ve compiled the following list.  Because we do not have any before that date, there is an obvious gap in the listing.  This is where you come in…

If I’ve forgotten one of the NEW car dealerships please make a comment or send me an email.  I’ll be happy to add it to the list!

  • Advantage Suzuki of Schaumburg
    650 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Audi Hoffman Estates
    1200 W. Golf Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Bob Rohrman Schaumburg Ford
    815 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Bob Rohrman Schaumburg Lincoln
    1200 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Colonial Chevrolet
    1100 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Ed Murphy Buick-Opel-Suzuki-Volkswagen
    1000 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Fireside Chrysler Plymouth
    1020 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Fireside Imports-Fiat, Mazda
    1020 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Fox Valley Volkswagen Schaumburg
    1000 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Franklin Weber Pontiac  (Est. 1968)
    100 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Harbor Pontiac  (Est. 1996)
    100 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Jacobs Davids Bierk Cadillac
    526 Mall Drive
    Schaumburg
  • Jeep Eagle of Schaumburg
    920 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Land Rover Hoffman Estates
    1051 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Larry Faul Oldsmobile-Peugeot-GMC Truck Co.
    1230 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Larry Faul Pontiac Subaru
    100 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Mercedes-Benz of Hoffman Estates
    1000 W. Golf Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Muller’s Woodfield Acura
    1099 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Napleton’s Schaumburg Pontiac-GMC Trucks  (Est. 2001)
    100 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Napleton Subaru
    911 W. Higgins Road
    Schaumburg
  • Northwest Acura
    1099 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Northwest Lincoln-Mercury
    1200 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick BMW
    700 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick Cadillac
    526 Mall Drive
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick Hyundai
    1020 E. Golf Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Patrick Mini
    700 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick Saab
    524 Mall Drive
    Schaumburg
  • Patrick Volvo
    526 Mall Drive
    Schaumburg
  • Resnick Automotive Group
    350 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Robert Harris’ Woodfield Oldsmobile/GMC Truck
    1230 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Roselle AMC Jeep
    920 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Roselle Dodge
    208 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Saturn of Hoffman Estates
    125 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Schaumburg AMC (Pacer, Gremlin, Hornet, Matador)
    921 W. Higgins Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Audi
    320 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Chrysler Plymouth Mazda
    1020 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Datsun
    910 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Dodge
    208 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Honda
    750 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Hyndai
    690 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Isuzu
    650 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Lincoln-Mercury
    1200 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Mitsubishi
    660 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Oldsmobile
    1230 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Saturn
    125 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Schaumburg Subaru
    911 W. Higgins Road
    Schaumburg
  • Schaumburg Toyota Scion  (Est. 1978)
    875 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Suburban Volkswagen
    320 W. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Woodfield Chevrolet-Geo
    1100 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Woodfield Ford
    815 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg
  • Woodfield Hummer
    1100 E. Golf Road
    1230 E. Golf Road (later)
    Schaumburg
  • Woodfield Hyundai
    125 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Woodfield Lexus
    155 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Woodfield Nissan
    700 W. Higgins Road
    Hoffman Estates
  • Ziegler Chevrolet
    1230 E. Golf Road
    Schaumburg

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

 

SCHAUMBURG THROUGH THE DECADES: A MONTHLY LOOK BACK (NOVEMBER)

November 20, 2016

During Schaumburg’s 60th anniversary year of 2016, we will take a look back at the Schaumburg  you’ve known for the last six decades.  Every month there will be a posting on 3 village happenings for each decade the village has been in existence.  Maybe you remember some of the events and have something more to add to a few of the items?  Send in your comments!

60 Years Ago in 1956

  • More than 1500 suburban residents–including those from the newly formed village of Schaumburg–participated in a fund drive to raise $1 million for a new hospital to be built near Arlington Heights.  The hospital was to be named Northwest Community Hospital and is shown below.northwest-community-hospital
  • In a classified ad in The Herald, a “modern 2-family house, [with] income $200 per month, large barn [on] 5 3/4 acres” was listed for $17,000.  It was listed as being the first house east of the church in Schaumburg.  The reference is to St. Peter Lutheran Church along Schaumburg Road.
  • Anyone having scrap paper and/or rags was invited to drop them off at St. Peter Lutheran School on Friday, November 23, the day of their Scrap Paper Drive.  It was requested that the bundles be securely tied.

50 Years Ago in 1966

  • Ace Hardware, at the corner of Schaumburg and Roselle Roads, was having a sale on the following products:  TV tray table set for $5.99, deluxe wall can opener for $5.87, portable ice crusher for $7.99, 8-inch cast iron skillet for $1.89, bath scale for $8.99 and clock radio for $13.88.clock-radio
  • It was announced in mid November that Mayor Robert Atcher would run for reelection the following April.  A slate of three additional village board candidates of the Schaumburg United Party (SUP) was also announced.  They include:  Raymond Kessell, Donald Wench and Gordon Mullins.  Sandy Carsello was also included as a candidate for Village Clerk.
  • An open house for the new Thomas Dooley school was scheduled for Sunday, November 20 from 1-4 p.m.  It is the 12th school in Schaumburg Township and the third school in the village of Schaumburg.  The building was built to resemble its sister school, Winston Churchill School, in Hoffman Estates.  The principal was Karl Plank who had been previously employed as principal at Black Hawk school.

40 Years Ago in 1976

  • Schaumburg banded together with seven other northwest suburban communities to begin the process of getting on the Lake Michigan water pipeline.  The name of the group was called SHARE +3.  The projected cost for the village was $11.8 million to $16.6 million.
  • Schaumburg Road between Springinsguth and Barrington Road was scheduled to be improved and widened.  The award for the 1 1/2 mile stretch of road was awarded to Palumbo Excavating Co.
  • Musicland and J.G. Music Center in Woodfield Mall was advertising specials on the following stereo lps and tapes:  Phoebe Snow’s It Looks Like Phoebe Snow, Blue Oyster Cult’s Agents of Fortune, Earth Wind & Fire’s Spirit, Neil Diamond’s Beautiful Noise, Boz Scagg’s Silk Degrees, O’ Jays’ Message in the Music, and Boston’s Boston.  

30 Years Ago in 1986

  • Daruma of Schaumburg which opened at 1823 W. Golf Road in Schaumburg in August was reviewed in the Chicago Tribune.  The long-running, Japanese restaurant can still be found in the same location in the Poplar Creek Plaza thirty years later!daruma
  • On Black Friday, the Friday after Thanksgiving, the parking lot at Woodfield Mall was filled with 10,288 cars by 1:00 p.m.  The attendance was estimated to be 150,000 which was the norm for the past few years.
  • The Annex shopping center in Schaumburg was having sales at the following stores:  Mix ‘n Munch, Card & Gift Gallery, Pier 1 Imports, Kids Place, Stacy’s Bags and Baggage, Space Options, Pro Ski & Surf, Waves Personal Hair Care, Van Heusen Factory Store and Lingerie Factory.

20 Years Ago in 1996

  • Consideration was given by the village board to requiring address numbers of businesses to be a certain size, depending on how far the establishment is from the street.
  • It was reported that, for the first time, Septemberfest turned a profit and moved closer towards being a self-supporting event.  The success of the festival was attributed to corporate sponsorships, increased fees, in-kind donations, a larger take of the Taste of Schaumburg food and beverage receipts and cleanup by Manpower.
  • Mayor Larson laid the first brick of the new terminal at Schaumburg Regional Airport.  This kicked off the development of the building that would hold administrative offices, a restaurant, aircraft maintenance areas and a flight school.  Pilot Pete’s became the eventual restaurant and can still be found at the airport.pilot-petes

10 Years Ago in 2006

  • Schaumburg announced they would be be featuring another year of the outdoor holiday festival in Town Square called Christkindlesmarkt.  Sponsored with the Schaumburg Township District Library, the festival would be an open market with European influences.  A Festival of Lights would be part of the festivities as well as horse-drawn sleigh rides.
  • Janet Niemann, the founding chairperson of the Schaumburg Sister Cities Commission, passed away November 6.  She also chaired Schaumburg Township’s Youth Commission and was very involved in the Jaycees and Jayceettes, having been a past president.
  • El Meson, Rupert’s On The Top and Prairie Rock Brewing Company all were featured in a Night Out:  Guide for Dining and Entertainment in the Daily Herald.  

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

The photos of Northwest Community Hospital and the clock radio are used courtesy of the Daily Herald.  The photo of Pilot Pete’s is courtesy of Ted and John Koston from their Flickr page.  

CHRISTMAS IN THE SPRING VALLEY

November 20, 2016

The Volkening Heritage Farm & Merkle Cabin will help you experience the holiday season as it was in 1880s Schaumburg.  Elaborate Victorian decorations and traditional German foods filled the home with light and warmth, but farm work continued at its own pace.

See how German-American farm families in 19th century Schaumburg celebrated Christmas with traditional foods, simple homemade gifts and a continuation of their daily farm chores. Meet a traditional St. Nicholas and enjoy a cup of soup by the fireplace at the log cabin. The day will include refreshments, holiday treats, cookie decorating for the kids and craft activities.

Admission is $3/person or $12/family; free for children 3 and under.

Join the farm as they celebrate the holiday season on Saturday and Sunday, December 3 & 4 from 12 to 4 p.m.