WHO WAS MEACHAM ANYWAY?

We drive on them every day but do you know who the main roads of Schaumburg Township are named for?

Here is a list of some of the roads with an explanation of their names. (This is an update of the first blog posting that appeared back in December 2009.)

Barrington Road: Named for the town of Barrington, Illinois that is north of Schaumburg Township. The name was taken from Great Barrington, MA.

Biesterfield Road:  This is misspelled and is named for Conrad Biesterfeld, a local farmer who was also Township Highway Commissioner.

Bode Road:  Named for the Bode family that operated a tavern in early Hanover Township.

Fenz Road: Named for the Fenz family that owned the J. Fenz & Son General Merchandise store on the southwest corner of the intersection of Schaumburg and Roselle Roads.

Gannon Drive:  Named for Hoffman Estates Trustee James F. Gannon Jr. who served on the first Village Board.

Golf Road:  Named for the tiny village that lies between Glenview & Morton Grove.

Groen Lane and Groen Court:  Named for the Groen family who lived in a farmhouse that Fred Groen bought on the future Groen Lane in Schaumburg.

Harmon Boulevard:  Named for Hoffman Estates Trustee John Harmon who served on the first Village Board.

Hartmann Drive:  Named for landowner, Fred Hartmann, and family who owned a farm in the vicinity.

Hassell Road:  Named for Paul Hassell, a Chicago lawyer,  who was a gentleman farmer in the northwestern part of the township.

Higgins Road:  May have been named for F. Higgins who owned land along the road.

Irving Park Road:  Earlier sections of the road, closer to Chicago, were a plank road at one time. Named for author, Washington Irving.

Jones Road:  Originally named Jahns Road for the Jahn family who lived along the road.  Jahns Road is mentioned in a 1956 precinct list of registered voters.  Some time after that an error or change was made and it was renamed Jones.

Lengl Drive:  Name for Frank Lengl, the longtime owner of Lengl’s Schaumburg Inn that later became the Easy Street Pub.

Lunt Avenue:  This street is in an unincorporated development on the west side of Roselle Road at Nerge Road. It was subdivided into lots before 1940 and the street was later extended into the Centex Industrial Park in the southern part of Schaumburg. It refers to the same Lunt Avenue in the Rogers Park Neighborhood of Chicago. This was named for Stephen P. Lunt who was a member of the Rogers Park Building and Land Company, founded in 1873, which developed the community of Rogers Park. See also Pratt and Morse that are in the same neighborhood.

McConnor Parkway:  Named for W.S. McConnor, a Vice-President of Refining and Marketing for Union Oil in the 1970s. Union Oil’s headquarters was in the current Roosevelt University building.

Meacham Road:  Named for brothers Lyman, Harvey, Daniel and Dr. Silas Meacham who came from VT and settled near Medinah on the Cook/DuPage County line.

Mercury Drive: Named for the Mercury Products Corporation that is located on the street.

Meyer Road:  Named for Ben Meyer whose farm was in the vicinity.

Morse Avenue: This street is in an unincorporated development on the west side of Roselle Road at Nerge Road. It was subdivided into lots before 1940 and the street was later extended into the Centex Industrial Park in the southern part of Schaumburg. It refers to the same Morse Avenue in the Rogers Park Neighborhood of Chicago. It is named for Charles H. Morse who was a member of the Rogers Park Building and Land Company, founded in 1873, which developed the community of Rogers Park. See also Pratt and Lunt that are in the same neighborhood.

Nerge Road:  Named for Frederick Nerge, a German landowner, who insisted the township be named Schaumburg at an early government meeting.

Odlum Drive: Named for Gertrude and William Odlum who owned the large farm that was on the NW and SE corners of the intersection of Barrington and Schaumburg Roads.

Plum Grove Road:  The road led to Plum Grove, one of the original settlements of Palatine Township.

Pratt Boulevard: This street is in an unincorporated development on the west side of Roselle Road at Nerge Road which was subdivided into lots before 1940. The street was later extended into the Centex Industrial Park in the southern part of Schaumburg. It refers to the same Pratt Boulevard in the Rogers Park Neighborhood of Chicago. It is named for Paul and George Pratt who were members of the Rogers Park Building and Land Company, founded in 1873, which developed the community of Rogers Park. See also Morse and Lunt that are in the same neighborhood.

Quindel Avenue:  Named for H.E. Quindel who owned the Hardware Store on the SE corner of the intersection of Roselle and Schaumburg Roads that is currently Lou Malnatis. He also built the inn and hotel that later became Lengl’s Schaumburg Inn and the Easy Street Pub.

Rodenburg Road:  A town in the district of Schaumburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany, where a number of early Schaumburg Township residents were from.

Rohlwing Road:  Named for H. Rohlwing, a local farmer, businessman and former Highway Commissioner.

Roselle Road:  Named for Roselle Hough who founded the village of Roselle.

Sarah’s Grove Lane:  Named for the grove of trees that covers both sides of Schaumburg Road near Friendship Village.

Schaumburg Road:  Named for the area in Germany where many of the early German residents were from.

Scully Drive: Named for underground water and sewage contractors, Scully, Hunter & Scully. Neal Hunter was also the president of Lancer Development Corporation.

Seaver Lane:  Named for Hoffman Estates Trustee George Seaver who served on the Village Board in the 1960s.

Slingerland Drive: Named for Walter Slingerland who was one of the first village trustees elected in 1956. He also served as the Building Commissioner, a position that oversaw the entire building process from permit to construction to signing off on the completed structure.

Small Drive: Named for Tom Small, president of Sundance Homes.

Springinsguth Road:  Named for the Springinsguth family who had farms on both sides of Springinsguth Road.

Tower Road: Named for the longtime village water tower that is along Wiley Road that intersects Tower Road.

Volid Drive:  Named for Peter Volid who purchased the Sunderlage Farm from Lila Harrell in 1952 and used it as a country retreat until he sold it to the Robin Construction Co. in the mid 1960s.

Wiley Farm Court and Wiley Road: Named for the Frank and Loie Wiley family who bought a farm in 1944 at Plum Grove Road and the current Wiley Road that runs along I-90. Mr. Wiley served as a trustee on both the first boards of District 54 and the Village of Schaumburg.

Wilkening Road: Named for the Wilkening family who were the longtime German farmers who owned much of the property where the road is today. Siblings Walter and Sarah were the last Wilkenings to reside on the farm along Roselle Road.

Wise (Wiese) Road:  Originally named  for the Wiese family who lived along the road.  During an improvement of the road, the original sign was taken down and, upon completion of the work, the new sign was installed with the incorrect spelling.  It continues to go by the name Wise.

Withaegar Drive:  Named for the William Withaegar farm that was located where the road is today.

There are other streets in the industrial park in the southern part of the township that are clearly named for someone–specifically Estes, Albion, Wright and Mitchell. I ran these names past Mayor Larson to see if he had any clues. It was his thought that Wright Boulevard and Mitchell Boulevard were possibly named as an homage to the Wright brothers and Billy Mitchell who Mitchell Airport in Milwaukee is named for. Because the southern terminus of both streets is at the Schaumburg Regional Airport, I would say this is a distinct possibility. Thank you, Mayor!

If you know the reason behind the names of any others, please let me know!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library
jrozek@stdl.org

Streetwise Chicago by Don Hayner and Tom McNamee was used to write this blog posting. Thank you to them!

10 Responses to “WHO WAS MEACHAM ANYWAY?”

  1. P. Kennedy Says:

    This blog is very interesting! can’t wait to read more!

  2. M. Sculerati Says:

    This is great! Especially for lazy history lovers like myself! Thanks and I’ll look forward to more.

  3. Linda Engelking Says:

    We knew the Weise family very well and felt very sad they changed the name to Wise road.

  4. Duane S Says:

    I still remember when the intersection of Roselle Road and Higgins Road was a 2-way stop as each road was only 2 lanes wide. My mother got a warning once for a “rolling” stop on Roselle Road from a state trouper. Route 53 was only 2 lanes wide then and it had a warning sign which said “Dangerous Dip” which scared my 5-year-old brain.

  5. Duane S Says:

    Bode Road had a marked-off 1/4 mile length which was popular for drag racing in the 1960’s.

  6. Fred Luft Says:

    Thank you Jane for the updated info

  7. RANDALL SCHALLAU Says:

    Fenz rd.?

  8. Gail Baisler Says:

    This local history is fascinating …Thank you so much !!!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: