PART 2 OF SCHAUMBURG’S CONTINENTAL DIVIDE

 

Topographical map 2

I recently came across this 1953 topographical map of the Palatine quadrangle.  In looking over it, I noticed the blue stream running through the portion of the map shown above.  This is the West Branch of the Du Page River and it doesn’t start in Campanelli Park as I mentioned here.  If you follow it, you’ll notice that it once started just south and east of the intersection of Schaumburg and Springinsguth Roads.  With the development of the Weathersfield subdivision, the land–and the stream–were graded at some point, moving the starting point of the river further south.

At the time of this map’s publication, the land where the stream originated was part of  the Ode D. Jenning’s farm.  Mr. Jennings died in 1953 and the property then passed into his wife’s hands.  You can see their long lane ending at a group of buildings.  Three of the buildings on this property still stand.  You know them as the Schaumburg Barn, the offices of the Schaumburg Athletic Association and the Jennings home which serves as a location for a non-profit organization.  For more information, read about Mr. Jennings here and his farm here.

You’ll also notice in this map that you can actually see some of the ridge of the continental divide.  It is the portion that is outlined in a darker brown next to the number 28.  In reading a topographical map, these darker portions indicate a higher elevation of the land.  There is another such site almost due south.  This is the path of the continental divide that creates the drainage pattern for the township.

The green blob that straddles Schaumburg Road is Sarah’s Grove, pre-development.  This area later covered Timbercrest, The Woods (both appropriately named) and Friendship Village.  The long lane that runs south of the grove started at Roselle Road and ended at the Engelking farm.  It was the origination of today’s Weathersfield Way.

The racing oval to the south was part of the Daisy Mayer farm at the time.  According to an oral history done with Ralph Engelking, this oval was built in the Depression as a training track for trotters.  The farm was called May Day Stock Farm.

You can see another oval almost due east across Roselle Road.  This farm belonged to Virginia Mansfield who was known locally for the horses she raised.  These were two of five racing ovals in Schaumburg Township.

Topographical maps give a wealth of data from elevation to swampy areas to schools to cemeteries.  We have a number of them in the library’s Illinois Collection map file that cover Schaumburg Township.  Feel free to stop by anytime and take a look.  Or maybe you see something else that catches your eye on this map?  Leave a comment and let us know!

Jane Rozek
Local History Librarian
Schaumburg Township District Library

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2 Responses to “PART 2 OF SCHAUMBURG’S CONTINENTAL DIVIDE”

  1. Dave Olson Says:

    Interesting that the map spells it “Schaumberg” rather than “Schaumburg”… a typo, or was there some ambiguity as to the correct spelling?

    • jrozek Says:

      Good observation! Up until the village of Schaumburg came into existence in 1956, you could find Schaumburg spelled both ways. It happened in maps, books, newspapers and personal documents. I tend to check both spellings whenever I’m doing any research before that time period because I just never know…

      Jane Rozek
      Local History Librarian
      Schaumburg Township District Library

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