WHEN THE SETTLERS CAME TO SCHAUMBURG TOWNSHIP

How did the farmers come to settle in Schaumburg Township? Our early pioneers had varying reasons for coming to the “New World”. There were so many unsettling events in Europe that many came to find a better life and an opportunity to own land and provide for their families.settlers 2

In Germany, there always seemed to be one kind of conflict after another. The younger generation didn’t want to serve in the military as many of their ancestors had. Having land of their own was also a problem. A father could only leave land to his oldest son, or he could divide his land, giving smaller and smaller parcels to the other sons. There wasn’t much land to divide after several generations had worked it for decades. Brothers would work together or would decide that there was no longer a life for them in their village. For these reasons, many traveled to the United States in the hopes of buying land that was being offered by the government for $1.50 an acre.

After many years of fighting the Indians for control of their land, the federal government decided that the “Indian problem” needed to be solved. Thomas Jefferson had taken part in plans to move the Indians out of territory the U.S. wanted to settle, as early as 1803. It wasn’t until President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act in 1830 that the men and women came to settle the lands vacated by the Indian tribes.

Not only Germans came, but early settlers from the east coast decided to move further west to start farms all across the Midwest and western portions of the U.S. Many came from other countries in Europe. They traveled by ox cart, and by boat. When the great potato famine hit Ireland between 1845 and 1851, people were starving to death and they fled to the U.S. in large numbers looking for a way to work and raise their families.

The land was calling to all of them. The price was affordable and they came to this area of Schaumburg Township to settle with their families on rich farm land with water and scenery that reminded them of home.town square statues

They raised cattle, sheep, hogs, and planted crops to feed them. They had chickens, ducks and geese. Gardens were planted with all the produce they needed for the winter months. Fruit trees were planted and bee hives were set out in the orchards. The smoke house was built and life was good. This was what they had come here for.

They all moved on with the development of Hoffman Estates and other surrounding villages. The rural way of live was over. A new generation was buying homes and raising their families. We still have farms but they’re further west. Everyone seems to continue to move to find a better way of life.

Pat Barch
Hoffman Estates Village Historian
Eagle2064@comcast.net

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